Althusser

(redirected from Louis Althusser)
Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Althusser

(ˈɑːltuːsə; French ɑltusər)
n
(Biography) Louis. 1918–90, French Marxist philosopher, author of For Marx (1965) and Reading Capital (1965): committed to a mental hospital (1981) after killing his wife
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
A notre sens, comme disait le penseur francais, Louis Althusser : [beaucoup moins que]Rien n'est gratuit, tout a un sens![beaucoup plus grand que], le flechissement du secteur est manifestement du a deux facteurs concordantes.
By historicizing the "will to truth" (Michel Foucault), putting truth "in quotation marks" (Jacques Derrida), separating the sign from its referent (Louis Althusser), and miring the obvious in a miasma of charts and graphs (Claude Levi-Strauss) or tying it up in Borromean knots (Jacques Lacan), they probably caused us to lose contact with the simple, robust, and irrefutable aspects of the truth.
This essay studies a process set in motion over the course of the 1970s when the works of Jorge Luis Borges were placed in dialogue with the ideas of French Marxist philosopher Louis Althusser. I propose that Althusserianism catalyzes a major shift in the critical reception of Jorge Borges among critics and scholars on the Argentine left.
Love as effect and affection in the life of Louis Althusser: a mountain painted many times
INFLUENTIALReligion, Italian thinker Louis Althusser aptly observed, is an ideological State apparatuses, and therefore extremely influential in society.
Letters from inside the Italian Communist Party to Louis Althusser, Translated by Stephen M.
Granting, on these grounds, that culture must have its own internal logics, at least to some extent, Strathausen then restages the late-1960s debate between Jacques Monod and Louis Althusser. Monod, whose book Chance and Necessity was described by Althusser as a 'spontaneous philosophy of the scientists' (p87), argued that culture, having evolved by chance and become semi-autonomous, need have no teleological direction.
The third section focuses on three of FranceAEs postwar philosophers: Paul Ricoeur, Emmanuel Levinas, and Louis Althusser, who all spent time in German POW camps.