Louis Leakey


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Noun1.Louis Leakey - English paleontologist whose account of fossil discoveries in Tanzania changed theories of human evolution (1903-1972)
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"I feel like Leakey handing it off to Jane Goodall," he said, referencing her mentor, the paleoanthropologist Louis Leakey.
But the Intelligence Adviser to the government, AM MacDonald, counselled that there would be no advantage "but considerable disadvantage in acting until such time as the Kenyatta appeal has been decided."LOGICAL SUCCESSORActually, Dr Louis Leakey had told the colonial office that Mbiyu was not the logical successor to Jomo and was doing "relatively little harm by his presence in the UK".
I think I'd prefer to leave the fossil in what Kenyan archaeologist and anthropologist Louis Leakey used to call the "suspense account" until we have a lot more evidence.
You may have heard of Louis Leakey, the famous paleoanthropologist whose work contributed to what we know about human evolution today.
Arriving in Kenya in 1957, she began working as a secretary for the palaeontologist Louis Leakey, who believed he could learn more about early humans by studying the great apes.
The primatologist, now 83, was a 26-year-old secretary when her boss, Dr Louis Leakey, sent her to observe chimpanzees in the wild and the film pulls from 100 hours of footage by cameraman Hugo van Lawick, who would go on to become her husband.
Goodall, who had no training or degree, was sent by paleontologist Louis Leakey to learn about chimpanzees in the 60s.
Fossey was originally selected by Louis Leakey, archaeologist, to head research and a long term study of mountain gorillas.
The show was about a paleontologist named 'Louis Leakey'.
The pre-historic sites include Kariandusi, which was unearthed by Louis Leakey in the 1920s and contains pre-historic tools made by early humans between 1.4 million and 200,000 years ago.
So then I met Louis Leakey, and got the opportunity to go and learn about not just any animal, but the one most like us.
By luck or destiny, Goodall met famous paleontologist and anthropologist Louis Leakey, who offered her a job as his personal secretary.