Louis XVIII


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Louis XVIII

1755-1824.
King of France (1814-1824) who took the throne after Napoleon's abdication. His reign was interrupted by Napoleon's brief return to power in 1815.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Louis XVIII

n
(Biography) 1755–1824, king of France (1814–24); younger brother of Louis XVI. He became titular king after the death of Louis XVII (1795) and ascended the throne at the Bourbon restoration in 1814. He was forced to flee during the Hundred Days
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
Then Louis XVIII, who till then had been the laughingstock both of the French and the Allies, began to reign.
An old man, decorated with the cross of Saint Louis, now rose and proposed the health of King Louis XVIII. It was the Marquis de Saint-Meran.
Risking all to win all, he bought up Louis XVIII.'s most pressing debts, and was the first to settle nearly three million of them at twenty per cent--for he was lucky enough to be backed by Gobseck in 1814 and 1815.
So imprisoned and tortured was this gentle little heart, when in the month of March, Anno Domini 1815, Napoleon landed at Cannes, and Louis XVIII fled, and all Europe was in alarm, and the funds fell, and old John Sedley was ruined.
Mademoiselle Cormon and the Abbe de Sponde belonged to that "little Church," sublime in its orthodoxy, which was to the court of Rome what the Ultras were to be to Louis XVIII. The abbe, more especially, refused to recognize a Church which had compromised with the constitutionals.
1814: Louis XVIII took the throne of France after Napoleon's defeat and exile by the allies.
ng le Pique nce 1814: Louis XVIII took the throne of France after Napoleon's defeat and exile.
There is some debate over how Venus made it to France, but in the Louvre narrative the Marquis de Riviere, a French ambassador to the Ottoman empire at the time of her discovery, purchased the statue and offered it to Louis XVIII, who swiftly donated it to the Louvre.
And even Roosevelt had borrowed the phrase from Napoleon's history, with '100 days' used to describe the period between Napoleon's return from exile on the island of Elba to Paris on 20 March 1815 and the second restoration of King Louis XVIII on 8 July 1815, actually a period of 110 days.
Jelgava Palace was the official residence of Louis XVIII before he became King of France.
It was the seat of William Peveral, the son of William the Conqueror; of John Earl of Mortaigne, who succeeded his brother Richard the Lion Heart as King of England in 1199; and of Louis XVIII, the exiled King of France.
Its sumptuous rooms have marble fireplaces and rococo ceilings and the exiled King of France Louis XVIII even took up residence here with his court.