lemon verbena

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Related to Louisa: Louisa May Alcott

lemon verbena

n.
An aromatic shrub (Aloysia triphylla syn. Lippia citriodora) native to South America, cultivated for its fragrant foliage and flowers.

lemon verbena

n
(Plants) a tropical American verbenaceous shrub, Lippia citriodora, with slender lemon-scented leaves yielding an oil used in perfumery

lem′on verbe′na


n.
a South American plant, Aloysia triphylla, having long, slender leaves with a lemonlike fragrance.
Translations
EisenkrautZitronenstrauch
cedrónhierba luisaverbena de Indias
References in classic literature ?
Don't forget to send Louisa to me as soon as she has done her tea."
This done, she resumed her former place, and waited until Louisa appeared.
In ten minutes more, Louisa's meek knock was softly audible outside.
Phenomenon almost incredible though distinctly seen, what did he then behold but his own metallurgical Louisa, peeping with all her might through a hole in a deal board, and his own mathematical Thomas abasing himself on the ground to catch but a hoof of the graceful equestrian Tyrolean flower-act!
But, Louisa looked at her father with more boldness than Thomas did.
'Wanted to see what it was like,' returned Louisa, shortly.
Larry has been going it rather harder than usual lately--if cousin Louisa won't mind my mentioning it--having rather a stiff affair with the postmaster's wife in their village, or some one of that sort; and whenever poor Gertrude Lefferts begins to suspect anything, and he's afraid of trouble, he gets up a fuss of this kind, to show how awfully moral he is, and talks at the top of his voice about the impertinence of inviting his wife to meet people he doesn't wish her to know.
"Ah, if only you and Louisa went out more!" sighed Mrs.
It may, perhaps, be unnecessary to tell the reader that Louisa Grant never reasoned so much after the fashions of the world.
“I would give all my other secrets, Louisa,” exclaimed Miss Temple, laughing, and shaking back her dark locks, with a look of childish simplicity that her intelligent face seldom expressed, “to be mistress of all that those rude logs have heard and witnessed.”
Henrietta was perhaps the prettiest, Louisa had the higher spirits; and she knew not now, whether the more gentle or the more lively character were most likely to attract him.
Charles gave it for Louisa, Mary for Henrietta, but quite agreeing that to have him marry either could be extremely delightful.