Louisbourg

(redirected from Louisburg)
Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Louisburg: Fortress of Louisbourg

Lou·is·bourg

or Lou·is·burg  (lo͞o′ĭs-bûrg′)
A town of Nova Scotia, Canada, on the eastern coast of Cape Breton Island. It is the site of an 18th-century French fortress that has been reconstructed as a museum.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Louisbourg

(ˈluːɪsˌbɜːɡ)
n
(Placename) a fortress in Canada, in Nova Scotia on SE Cape Breton Island: founded in 1713 by the French and strongly fortified (1720–40); captured by the British (1758) and demolished; reconstructed as a historic site
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
He planned, in 1745, an expedition against Louisburg. This was a fortified city, on the island of Cape Breton, near Nova Scotia.
As the siege of Louisburg was one of the most remarkable events that ever the inhabitants of New England were engaged in, Grandfather endeavored to give his auditors a lively idea of the spirit with which they set about it.
The expedition against Louisburg first began to be thought of in the month of January.
A few days afterwards an English fleet, commanded by Commodore Peter Warren, sailed also for Louisburg to assist the provincial army.
In every family, when the good man lifted up his heart in domestic worship, the burden of his petition was for the safety of those dear ones who were fighting under the walls of Louisburg.
One of them was Monsieur Bouladrie, who had been commander of a battery outside the walls of Louisburg. The other was the Marquis de la Maison Forte, captain of a French frigate which had been taken by Commodore Warren's fleet.
I have seen a full-length portrait of him, representing him in a splendid scarlet uniform, standing before the walls of Louisburg, while several bombs are falling through the air."
"But did the country gain any real good by the conquest of Louisburg?" asked Laurence.
"The mothers of the young men who were killed at the siege of Louisburg would not have thought it so," said Laurence.
Grandfather went on to say that the success of the expedition against Louisburg induced Shirley and Pepperell to form a scheme for conquering Canada, This plan, however, was not carried into execution.
With this force the French intended to retake Louisburg, and afterwards to ravage the whole of New England.
Portions of their attire had probably been worn at the siege of Louisburg, and the coats of most recent cut might have been rent and tattered by sword, ball, or bayonet, as long ago as Wolfe's victory.