Louisiana French


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Louisiana French

n.
French as spoken by the descendants of the original French settlers of Louisiana.

Loui′sian′a French′


n.
1. the form of French spoken by the Cajuns; Cajun. Abbr.: LaF
2. any of the French-based languages spoken in Louisiana, including, in addition to Cajun speech, the colonial French perpetuated in Creole communities and the creolized language of certain black communities.
References in periodicals archive ?
(40) With this ever-increasing Americanization, Louisiana French eventually lost its dominant positiqn, even in its own natural South Louisiana habitat.
Although thousands of Creoles and Cajuns still learned their French at home, thousands more would grow up without fluent knowledge of their cultural language as American radio and popular music, English-language newspapers, and school instruction in English began to crowd out any public or quasiofficial recognition of Louisiana French. (44)
Picone, and Valdman in their description of the lexicon: they argue for a fundamental unity among the French-related varieties, justifying the combination of the lexicons under the single label of 'Louisiana French'.
Karin Flikeid and Raymond Mougeon deal with Acadian and Ontarian French respectively, and Pierre Rezeau examines lexical links between Louisiana French and varieties within France, and proposes a methodology for comparative lexicographical research.
L'etat de la Louisiane semblait donner sa reponse relativement tot a cette question en adoptant les lois 408 et 409 de la session legislative de 1968, qui ont commence le mouvement qui s'appelle <<la Renaissance Cadiennee>> ou <<the Louisiana French movement.>> (36) Mais avant que j'aborde le sujet de ces decrets et de leur langage interessant, permettez-moi de tracer brievement l'histoire du mouvement moderne pour la preservation du francais louisianais.
(36.) Vide BRASSEAUX, supra note 2, a 132 (noter "the beginning of the Cajun cultural renaissance in 1968"); DORMON, supra note 8, a 82 ("A series of legislative actions in July, 1968, provided the necessary legal base for the [French language preservation] movement, and supplied the official sanction deemed essential by the founders."); HENRY & BANKSTON, supra note 34, at 149; Jacques Henry, The Louisiana French Movement: Actors and Actions in Social Change, in FRENCH AND CREOLE IN Louisiana 183, 183, 185, 190 (Albert Valdman ed., 1997); Barry Jean Ancelet, Louisiana Cajun French and Creole, www.cajunnetwork.com/ccfma/Ancelet4.html (visite dernier en 26 avril 2006).

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