Louisiana Purchase


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Louisiana Purchase

A former territory of the western United States extending from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains. It was purchased from France on April 30, 1803, for $15 million and officially explored by the Lewis and Clark expedition (1804-1806).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Louisiana Purchase

n
(Placename) the large region of North America sold by Napoleon I to the US in 1803 for 15 million dollars: consists of the W part of the Mississippi basin. Area: about 2 292 150 sq km (885 000 sq miles)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Loui′sian′a Pur′chase


n.
the territory that the U.S. purchased from France in 1803 for $15,000,000, extending from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains and from the Gulf of Mexico to Canada.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Louisiana Purchase - territory in the western United States purchased from France in 1803 for $15 millionLouisiana Purchase - territory in the western United States purchased from France in 1803 for $15 million; extends from the Mississippi River to the Rocky Mountains and from the Gulf of Mexico to Canada
U.S.A., United States, United States of America, US, USA, America, the States, U.S. - North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the 19th century, the US vastly expanded its territory through various means, including the Louisiana Purchase, a deal done with France which nearly doubled the size of the young country.
"Jai Alai: A Cultural History of the Fastest Game in the World" deftly outlines the multifaceted history of the sport, from its beginnings in Basque country to its North American "unveiling" at the 1904 Louisiana Purchase Centennial Exposition and World's Fair and to its rise and fall in popularity in the United States.
Two, Detroit and Michilimackinac on Mackinac Island between Michigan's lower and upper peninsulas, became sites of a flourishing Indian trade in animal furs that stretched deep into the trans-Appalachian west and, eventually, the lands and waters of the Louisiana Purchase. In the Jay Treaty of 1794, Britain agreed to hand Detroit and Michilimackinac over to the Americans but secured concessions that allowed its merchants to continue plying their trade.
Exhibits and visitors center for the Louisiana Purchase State Park.
A nearly 10-year-long saga involving ranchers, federal agents and the Louisiana Purchase came to an end Wednesday when parties in a federal lawsuit reached a settlement.
government-sanctioned exploration and mapping of the area known as the Louisiana Purchase and lasted for roughly 29 months.
Indeed, the Haitian Revolution of 1791-1804 forced not only the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, but also the migration of the enslaved, slave owners, and free Black people and mulattos between the two former French territories.
The Louisiana Purchase Exposition, also known as the St Louis World's Fair, was an international event showcasing cutting-edge engineering, held in 1904.
After the Louisiana Purchase of 1803, however, the Mississippi Valley economy was slowly re-geared toward agriculture as white American settlers sought to take advantage of the area's rich riparian bottomlands.
Masterfully blending history and fiction, Pfarrer tells the story of a young artillery officer, Philip Nolan, who becomes embroiled in Aaron Burr's 1807 conspiracy to invade the territories of the Louisiana Purchase. Insinuating his scheme has official approval, Burr convinces Nolan to carry a coded message into the Orleans Territory.
They relate to George Washington's declaration of neutrality, the Alien and Sedition Acts, the Louisiana Purchase, Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation, the impeachment of Andrew Johnson, the Espionage Act of 1917, Pearl Harbor and Roosevelt's request for a declaration of war, the Nazi saboteurs, Japanese internment, the Bay of Pigs invasion, Watergate, the Iran/Contra affair, the impeachment of President Clinton, the PATRIOT Act, prisoner torture during the administration of George W.

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