Low German


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Low German

n.
1. The German dialects of northern Germany. Also called Plattdeutsch.
2. The continental West Germanic languages except High German.

[Translation of German Niederdeutsch : nieder, low (from the lowland terrain of northern Germany) + Deutsch, German.]

Low German

n
(Languages) a language of N Germany, spoken esp in rural areas: more closely related to Dutch than to standard High German. Also called: Plattdeutsch Abbreviation: LG See also German1, High German1

Low′ Ger′man


n.
the West Germanic dialects of N Germany, forming with Dutch a single dialect complex. Abbr.: LG
[1835–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Low German - a German dialect spoken in northern Germany
West Germanic, West Germanic language - a branch of the Germanic languages
Old Saxon - Low German prior to 1200
Middle Low German - Low German from 1100 to 1500
References in classic literature ?
If, in walking up the schoolroom, I pass near her, she puts out her foot that it may touch mine; if I do not happen to observe the manoeuvre, and my boot comes in contact with her brodequin, she affects to fall into convulsions of suppressed laughter; if I notice the snare and avoid it, she expresses her mortification in sullen muttering, where I hear myself abused in bad French, pronounced with an intolerable Low German accent.
The story of the Low German exodus out of Canada and subsequent "return" migrations is both "unique and universal" (11).
The Swedish noun as well as the verb maja, maje erect maypoles, adorn with leafy branches has been borrowed from (Middle) Low German < LGerm.
Of the individuals served, 71% were Latinos and 27% were Low German.
It is not always possible to determine if the word has been borrowed from Old Swedish, Swedish or even Low German (like in case of laadik 'casket', moon 'provisions', nunn 'nun', reede 'Friday').
Friesen does a masterful job of portraying the peasant lifestyle of replanted Russian Mennonites as is evident in the many expressions that appear to be direct translations from the Mennonite dialect commonly known as Low German.
The areas of Low German speech have, or had, a distribution along the riparian lowlands of Northern Germany from the Netherlands via the Danish-German borderlands to the Polish border (formerly into East Prussia) (Oeter, Walker 2006).
It has been accepted that Low German shares more features with Balto-Slavic languages than High German, palatalization being one of them (Stanisic 2006:118), which dovetails into the present proposal.
Being able to borrow at low German rates helped create real estate bubbles in Spain and Ireland and sent the Greeks and Portuguese on a spending spree.
A real shift occurred in the late 50s and 60s when the Low German language became less used.
The book begins with Mirfield's Anglian origins - the name derives from the Low German 'mear feld', meaning 'pleasant clearing' - and continues through the Middle Ages, through the industrial revolution to near the present day.
The word "wafre" in Middle English was adopted from the word "wafel" appearing in Middle Low German, which then later changed to the Modern Dutch "wafel," French "gaufre" and the German "waffle.