Low German


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Low German

n.
1. The German dialects of northern Germany. Also called Plattdeutsch.
2. The continental West Germanic languages except High German.

[Translation of German Niederdeutsch : nieder, low (from the lowland terrain of northern Germany) + Deutsch, German.]

Low German

n
(Languages) a language of N Germany, spoken esp in rural areas: more closely related to Dutch than to standard High German. Also called: Plattdeutsch Abbreviation: LG See also German1, High German1

Low′ Ger′man


n.
the West Germanic dialects of N Germany, forming with Dutch a single dialect complex. Abbr.: LG
[1835–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Low German - a German dialect spoken in northern Germany
West Germanic, West Germanic language - a branch of the Germanic languages
Old Saxon - Low German prior to 1200
Middle Low German - Low German from 1100 to 1500
References in periodicals archive ?
The Swedish noun as well as the verb maja, maje erect maypoles, adorn with leafy branches has been borrowed from (Middle) Low German < LGerm.
Of the individuals served, 71% were Latinos and 27% were Low German.
It is not always possible to determine if the word has been borrowed from Old Swedish, Swedish or even Low German (like in case of laadik 'casket', moon 'provisions', nunn 'nun', reede 'Friday').
Friesen does a masterful job of portraying the peasant lifestyle of replanted Russian Mennonites as is evident in the many expressions that appear to be direct translations from the Mennonite dialect commonly known as Low German.
This was the case of Low German (also called Sassisch and Platt), formerly a language in its own right more related to Dutch than to High German.
The government also pressed Mennonites to teach Russian in their schools, alongside High German, but left them free to speak Low German (a Northern German dialect with some Dutch influence) in the everyday (Thiessen 2003, x-xiii; Staliunas 2007).
In 1696, the present name Kiek in de Kok was also mentioned, meaning "peek into the kitchen" in Low German.
Her last words in Low German were: "Boys, if you can emigrate, then go, even if you have to leave everything behind" (247).
But the scope of this collection excludes, for example, fifteenth-century books (I avoid the term incunabula, which arbitrarily and misleadingly refers to books printed before 1500 as though they were somehow different from those printed for the next quarter-century or so), the vast majority of which were on religious topics, and which included dozens of editions of the Bible in the vernacular--twenty-four editions of the full Bible in German and Low German alone were printed before Luther's 1522 September Testament.
The other thing that I learned about Northumbrian dialect words is that they are all derived from Low German and, indeed, were you to take yourselves to the Friesian Islands (no, neither am I) you would find many Northumbrian words in everyday use there.
Knack' probably comes from 'knak', Dutch or Low German for a sharp blow, while 'knacker' developed from 'hnakkur' or 'knakhr', respectively Old Norse and Icelandic for harness maker and saddle.
In the fifth article in the book part on political and historical borders, Larissa Naiditch provides an overview of the consonant system in Mennonite Low German.