lowballing


Also found in: Thesaurus, Financial, Wikipedia.

low·ball

(lō′bôl′)
tr.v. low·balled, low·bal·ling, low·balls Informal
To underestimate or understate (a cost) deliberately: "I get hopping mad every time I see a politician lowballing the cost of his latest healthcare boondoggle" (Megan McArdle).

[From the card game of the same name.]

low′ball′ adj.

lowballing

(ˈləʊˌbɔːlɪŋ)
n
the practice of offering a customer a deceptively low price
References in periodicals archive ?
That means working with a lower fee margin instead of lowballing the employee while providing quality workers to the client.
Walter Frank and his team have argued all year, and earlier, that Wall Street (and companies) were lowballing their profit estimates after having been burned so badly by their wild estimates during the bubble.
I am sure that I along with other shareholders in Sirius XM will be interested in a legal challenge to John Malone's company for lowballing Sirius XM's shareholder value.
The Tara Hill homeowners alleged that their insurer, Scottsdale Insurance Company, deliberately misled them in first advising them they had suffered no earthquake damage at all, and then lowballing and underestimating the damage once the homeowners renewed their claim under the new legislation.
Lowballing or not, buyers' stubborn refusal to pay listing prices appears to be having an impact on the market.
He said the nuclear negotiations with the Group 5+1 (the US, Russia, China, Britain and France plus Germany) are progressing well, but "they are lowballing with regard to certain issues that we had agreed on.
He said the nuclear negotiations with the G5+1 are progressing well, but "they are lowballing with regard to certain issues that we had agreed on.
WASHINGTON, April 16, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- The Homeowners Consumer Center is now urging homeowners anywhere in New York to contact them immediately at 866-714-6466, if they had significant winter home damage as a result of a severe winter storm, and if their homeowners insurance company is lowballing the proposed insurance claim settlement offer to make repairs, and offering settlements that are not adequate to make the necessary repairs to the home.
As a result, the FSA did not respond rapidly to clues that lowballing might be occurring.