Lowlander


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low·land·er

 (lō′lən-dər)
n.
A native or inhabitant of a lowland.

Low•land•er

(ˈloʊ lən dər, -ˌlæn-)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of the Lowlands of Scotland.
2. (l.c.) an inhabitant of any lowland region.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lowlander - a native of the Lowlands of Scotland
Scot, Scotchman, Scotsman - a native or inhabitant of Scotland
Translations
ساكِن الأرض المُنْخَفِضَه
-ka nížinobyvatel
der bor i lavlandetperson
alföldi ember
maîur sem bÿr á láglendi
obyvateľ nížin
ova halkından

lowlander

[ˈləʊləndəʳ] Nhabitante mf de tierra baja

low1

(ləu) adjective
1. not at or reaching up to a great distance from the ground, sea-level etc. low hills; a low ceiling; This chair is too low for the child.
2. making little sound; not loud. She spoke in a low voice.
3. at the bottom of the range of musical sounds. That note is too low for a female voice.
4. small. a low price.
5. not strong; weak or feeble. The fire was very low.
6. near the bottom in grade, rank, class etc. low temperatures; the lower classes.
adverb
in or to a low position, manner or state. The ball flew low over the net.
ˈlower verb
1. to make or become less high. She lowered her voice.
2. to let down. He lowered the blinds.
ˈlowly adjective
of low rank; humble.
ˈlowliness noun
ˈlow-down adjective
mean; contemptible. a low-down thief.
ˈlowland adjective
of or concerning lowlands. lowland districts.
ˈlowlander noun
a person who lives in the lowlands.
ˈlowlands noun plural
land which is low compared with other, higher land.
ˈlow-lying adjective
(of land) at a height not much above sea-level.
low-ˈtech noun
technology using simple tools and unsophisticated equipment and methods.
adjective
low-tech industries/skills.
low tide/water
the time when the sea is lowest at a particular place during ebb-tide. There is three feet of water in the harbour, even at low water.
be low on
not to have enough of. I'll have to go to the supermarket – we're low on coffee and sugar.
References in classic literature ?
When your heart overfloweth broad and full like the river, a blessing and a danger to the lowlanders: there is the origin of your virtue.
Staff on the northbound Lowlander service activated the train's emergency brake to bring it to a halt several hundred yards past the platform on Thursday morning.
The overnight Lowlander service suffered a "technical issue with the coaches" and terminated at Stafford yesterday.
The launch event marks the public introduction of the new carriages on the Lowlander Service between London Euston and Glasgow Central or Edinburgh Waverley.
This has become evident in the now widespread use of the uniporme or 'uniform' that, in lowlander's eyes, identifies the rightful datu and bae leaders of the Higaunon.
The authors have concluded that soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) plasma concentration measured before hypoxic exposure may predict susceptibility of a lowlander to high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE).
A Lowlander is kidnapped on the way to collect his inheritance at the instigation of his wicked uncle, before teaming up with a rebellious Jacobite and running away from redcoats in Scotland (1960)
Gael and Lowlander in Scottish Literature: Cross-Currents in Scottish Writing in the Nineteenth Century.
It's a good club and a beautiful place." Wildschut's fellow lowlander Vossen believes he's joined a "huge club".
A subtle Lowlander's character began to emerge in his native land Papile (born in 1942, 19 August in Akmenes District), where people lacked neither diligence nor spirituality.
One could infer from that fact that a healthy, non-smoking lowlander living at high altitude has the capability to grow new alveoli.
Generally speaking, if you are not a highlander then you are a lowlander, a Sassenach.