Barotse

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Barotse

(bəˈrɒtsɪ)
npl -se or -ses
1. (Peoples) a member of a Negroid people of central Africa living chiefly in SW Zambia
2. (Languages) the language spoken by this people; Lozi
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
This proved a large and challenging undertaking, involving animal reintroductions, sometimes unpopular with the local Lozi people. Tracking devices and other observations were used to monitor animal resettlement and reintroductions.
It was in this regard that Gluckman took to the field in the Bulozi flood plains, spreading propaganda in order to win the Lozi people's sympathy and loyalty for the Allied powers war effort.
Gluckman was tasked to continue his study of the Lozi people. Another scholar, J F Holleman, who had been appointed under the Beit Trust grant, went to study the Shona people of Southern Rhodesia.
And more information about the Lozi people and their way of life during this period would have been helpful.
However, when Dr Livingstone first visited the falls, he was accompanied by his Makololo carriers, a people from Lesotho related to the Lozi people of Zambia who live immediately to the west of the Tokaleya.
Their project in Zambia involved assessing the tourism potential of the kingdom of Barotseland, home of the Lozi people, and recommending an initial development plan to the king and his royal cabinet.
"We have negotiated with the Lozi People in Zambia's Western Province for land near the Zambezi for purpose-built sheltered accommodation that will provide 742 units," said Mr Full.
Loads of activities are planned, including the universities' female crews taking part, plus men's crews competing in canoes against crews from the Lozi people (one of Zambia's 73 tribes).
And also because Caprivi's political, economic and socio-cultural history has been that of the Lozi people of Barotseland, now part of Western Zambia, and not that of the Ovambo or other groups in Namibia today.