Luang Prabang

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Luang Prabang

(luːˈæŋ prɑːˈbæŋ)
n
(Placename) a market town in N Laos, on the Mekong River: residence of the monarch of Laos (1946–75). Pop: 26 400 (2003 est)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Lu•ang Pra•bang

(luˈɑŋ prɑˈbɑŋ)
n.
a city in N Laos, on the Mekong River: former royal capital. 44,244.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
(2) Justin McDaniel argues that manuscripts travelled between northern Thailand and Laos and that Luang Phrabang (as centre of the Lan Xang kingdom) also influenced Lanna ('Northern Thai') Buddhism, especially during the nineteenth century.
Nor does he focus exclusively on the rulers of Luang Phrabang, who became kings of Laos with the country's independence in 1953, although the portrayal of their family takes up the major part of the book.
"Sabaidee Luang Phrabang," (Good Morning Luang Phrabang) is co-directed by a Thai, Sakchai Deenan, and Kiev-educated Laotian Anusorn Srisakda.
"Good Morning Luang Phrabang" costs less than $200,000, and stars Bangkok-based Australian-Laotian thesp Ananda Everinghim as a photographer who travels through Laos and meets a Laotian guide, played by Vientienne beauty queen Khamlek Palawong.
Deenan says a Lao official accompanied his crew during the shoot to "give comments" and not to "supervise the production." Pic takes place in Laos, from Pak Xe in the south to the capital of Vientienne and Luang Phrabang.
in the form of snakelike water dragons; some fierce and unpredictable, some more benign." The Lao called the spirits "ngeuak," but later learned another word for them, the Indian word "naga." "In Buddhist mythology," Stuart-Fox continues, "a great naga had protected the Buddha when he was meditating, and the Lao believe that nagas will continue to protect all those who practise the truth he taught." Three cities were seen as protected by the naga, Luang Phrabang in the north, Viang Chan (Vientaine) in the center, and Champasak in the south.
Americans should not travel by road between Vang Vieng and Luang Phrabang along Route 13, and on Route 7 from the junction to Phonsavan town.
Since the 1990s, Lao have discreetly placed photos of Phetsarath on small Buddhist altars in numerous shops and houses, not only in Luang Phrabang but in other parts of the country as well.
He was born in 1890 into the royal family of Luang Phrabang, the son of the Viceroy Boun Khong.
In 1914, he joined the colonial administration as editor (redacteur) in the Office of Financial Management of the Kingdom of Luang Phrabang and then as a contractual editor (redacteur contractuel) in the Office of the Residence Superieure of Laos.
Phetsarath was clearly a man on the move; he most certainly did not remain cooped up in the royal palace in Luang Phrabang. As a result of his official positions and wide range of interests, he travelled throughout Laos on inspection tours; as an avid hunter, he ventured even further.
In 1917, with the backing of the young Prince, this precolonial practice was altered so that local civil servants could now be rotated among different districts in the same province--a policy already being followed in the Luang Phrabang Kingdom.