Lubitsch


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Lu·bitsch

 (lo͞o′bĭch), Ernst 1892-1947.
German filmmaker whose sophisticated comedies include Trouble in Paradise (1932) and Ninotchka (1939).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Lubitsch

(ˈluːbɪtʃ)
n
(Biography) Ernst. 1890–1947, US film director, born in Germany; best known for such sophisticated comedies as Forbidden Paradise (1924) and Ninotchka (1939)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Lubitsch - German filmmaker of sophisticated comedies (1892-1947)
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One bit -- where a mile-high-club sexual tussle results in the door of an airplane toilet shuttling repeatedly between 'Vacant' and 'Occupied', our only sign of the frantic shenanigans going on behind the door -- is a late example of what used to be known 90 years ago as 'the Lubitsch touch'.
The text will examine the many directors who successfully embraced the realistic inventive minimalism of the storytelling--and, by extension, demonstrate how "Paris" assisted in helping make the American career of the extraordinary Ernst Lubitsch, yet also temper the ramification by briefly examining his often neglected earlier German farces.
Directed by Ernst Lubitsch and released in 1940, this film tells the story of a shop clerk (Jimmy Stewart) who works in a tiny Budapest department store.
Among them are films from well-known names like Fritz Lang, Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau, Georg Wilhelm Pabst and Ernst Lubitsch. In other cases, their films were short works that didn't suggest they would later become stars.
Inspired by Ernst Lubitsch's 1932 classic film Broken Lullaby, Frantz explores the cultural and personal toll of war following World War I.
FRANTZ 12 WRITER-DIRECTOR Francois Ozon remakes Ernst Lubitsch's drama Broken Lullaby, using black and white photography for scenes set before World War I.
De Mille, Ernst Lubitsch, Howard Hawks, Alfred Hitchcock, John Ford, Fritz Lang, Max Ophuls, Douglas Sirk, Raoul Walsh, Jacques Tourneur, Josef von Sternberg, Orson Welles, Nicholas Ray, Samuel Fuller, and Jerry Lewis; the origins and development of auteur cinephilia and examples of films capturing sublime moments; and the changing nature of Hollywood and the auteur from the late 1970s, with the rise of directors like George Lucas and Steven Spielberg.
Directed by German emigre Billy Wilder, Some Like It Hot (1959) is perhaps most distinctly memorable for its final line, 'Nobody's perfect.' Across his five-decade catalogue of work as a writer and director, Wilder is renowned for such punchlines, something that was likely learned from his mentor, fellow emigre Ernst Lubitsch. As a pithy response, the final line channels many themes of the him, most notably the acceptance of the role of performance in gender and identity.
"Florence Foster Jenkins" the comedy-drama about the New York socialite who thought she was a great soprano, marked his fifth collaboration with British director Stephen Frears, whom he considers the modern successor to Billy Wilder and Ernst Lubitsch. Desplat earned Oscar nominations for Frears' "The Queen" and "Philomena."