Lucilius


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Lucilius

(luːˈsɪlɪəs)
n
(Biography) Gaius (ˈɡaɪəs). ?180–102 bc, Roman satirist, regarded as the originator of poetical satire
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in classic literature ?
Then there were Lucilius, and Catullus, and Naso, and Quintus Flaccus, - dear Quinty!
Seneca's Letter 114 to Lucilius Is all about style, About the questions of words And about the questions of shirts, The colors and the jewelry you choose, A wife, a friend, The slaves in your care, How the sun passes through The eye of the home.
For this reason, in a letter to young Lucilius (Letter 47 on the Treatment of Slaves) Seneca advised him to treat those in an inferior position exactly the same way he would like his superior to treat him (Gummere, 1915).
letter to Lucilius, "However much you possess there's someone
A 1915 essay by Maine Supreme Court Justice Lucilius A.
They are the ones Michel de Montaigne explored in more than 1,000 pages of writing, his famous Essais, as he sought in the midst of terrible crisis to understand humanity and thus himself; they are the subjects Seneca exhorted his friend Lucilius to study in order to live according to nature, and they are the ones Condorcet insisted be at the center of his proposed education curriculum designed to enable the exercise of real freedom in Revolutionary France: the natural and social sciences, mathematics, history, fine art, philosophy, literature, music, and languages.
In this book, editor and translator Eliot Maunder presents readers with a collection of three of Roman philosopher SenecaAEs letters to his friend Lucilius. The text makes for a great introduction to both SenecaAEs personal philosophy and his use of the Latin language to convey that philosophy.
As Seneca writes elsewhere, in his letters to Lucilius, imperare sibi maximum imperium est ("To rule oneself is the greatest empire").
This translation, the first in English in nearly a century, presents Seneca's 124 letters to his young friend Gaius Lucilius Iunior, in a rendering that serves "thoughts, not words." While literalness takes a backseat to readability, translators Margaret Graver and A.A.
At the time Seneca wrote to his friend Lucilius, pagan philosophers and orators had debated the question for almost five centuries.
When he facilitates Lucilius' marriage to the daughter of an old Athenian by conferring a fortune, he lists two justifications for this act: they are in love and "This gentleman of mine hath served me long" (1.1.144-146).