Lucretia

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Lucretia

(luːˈkriːʃɪə)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) (in Roman legend) a Roman woman who killed herself after being raped by a son of Tarquin the Proud
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

Lucretia

[luːˈkriːʃə] NLucrecia
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
Caroline shook her loose ringlets of abundant but somewhat coarse hair over her rolling black eyes; parting her lips, as full as those of a hot-blooded Maroon, she showed her well-set teeth sparkling between them, and treated me at the same time to a smile "de sa facon." Beautiful as Pauline Borghese, she looked at the moment scarcely purer than Lucrece de Borgia.
five hundred years after your death the sage Rashi relates a tale that your husband cited a tractate saying "women are light-minded" that you denied this that he set his student to seduce you that you resisted then succumbed and hung yourself let me beg to doubt this the Romans liked such tales Dido immolates herself for love Lucrece stabs herself for shame of such deeds the nations create high art but what kind of story is this forJews why didn't your husband hang himself for shame
William Shakespeare's Lucrece and Matthew Arnold's "Sohrab and Rustum" are examples of epyllions in English.
In the context of English literary history, Chaucer's Legend of Lucrece marks the beginning of a long lineage of literary elaborations of this narrative.
At the other end, for Shakespeare in his narrative poems, Eastern imports make possible subtle and respectful revisions to Ovid, helping Shakespeare to offer readers some consolation for the sad fates of Lucrece and Adonis.
Charismatic Camille portrays both the psyche of Tarquin, consumed by lust; and Lucrece who is asleep when he breaks into her room.
The emotional piece tells the ancient Roman story of Lucrece, the chaste wife of the general Collatinus, who was raped at knife point by Tarquin, a jealous junior officer.
(1.1.434-39), which Airey explains thusly: "Brutus's use of Lucrece's knife is a less obvious but no less definite act of blood drinking than that of the royalists ...
The Spanish Tragedy, The White Devil, Hamlet, Lucrece, and Titus Andronicus, as well as looking at how lamentation frames Richard III and the figure of King Lear as symbolic of a female mourner.
Chapters on Shakespeare's English version of Lucan's Roman civil war (the three Henry VI plays and Richard III), Venus and Lucrece, Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, and "the radical Hamlet" reveal Shakespeare's preoccupation with republican stories.