Tieck

(redirected from Ludwig Tieck)
Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Tieck

(German tiːk)
n
(Biography) Ludwig (ˈluːtvɪç). 1773–1853, German romantic writer, noted esp for his fairy tales
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Schlegel also published a collection of Hardenberg's poetic writings after Hardenberg died, co-edited by Ludwig Tieck (1773-1853), another leading figure in German Romanticism.
Nevertheless, a generally-accepted cadre of authors includes Novalis, Friedrich and August Wilhelm Schlegel, Ludwig Tieck, Joseph von Eichendorff, and E.T.A.
As a young man he enjoyed Ludwig Tieck's chivalric romances and cast one of them into a song cycle, the Romanzen Aus Die Schone Magelone.
There would be no Romantic era without the German Kunstmarchen: long, rambling, symbolic narratives by predecessors and contemporaries of the Grimms, including Johann Karl August Musaus, Ludwig Tieck, and E.
33, Brahms's settings of poetry by Ludwig Tieck. Some of the claims advanced here are perfectly reasonable: that nineteenth-century Heder recitals were shaped by a different set of ideas about programming, that the op.
Fin dalle prime rappresentazioni dei piu importanti testi teatrali di Luigi Pirandello, agli inizi degli anni Venti del Novecento, e stato fatto il nome di Ludwig Tieck. Il richiamo all'invenzione del "teatro-nel-teatro" dell'autore del Gestiefelter Kater, peraltro, non e mai stato approfondito nell'ambito dell'esegesi dell'opera pirandelliana.
The authors featured are John Polidori, Ludwig Tieck, Alexander Dumas, Joseph Sheridan le Fanu, Arthur Young, Robert C.
German literary influences on Nathaniel Hawthorne, in particular, those of Ludwig Tieck and E.
Despite the fact that Tieck's translations largely remained anonymous (since her father, Ludwig Tieck, published them under his name) until 1992, the "manifold possibilities, identities, and desires that arise in Shakespeare's sonnets" (17) are brought to light through her voice.
Ludwig Tieck's 1793 Herr von Fuchs was the first German version of Ben Jonson's Volpone, in spite of which its adapter consciously refrained from offering his contemporaries a literal version of this classical piece of drama but provided them with that type of creative version which, in Goethe's view, appropriates the foreign idea and represents it as its own (1820: 459) (1).