logging

(redirected from Lumber industry)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

log·ging

 (lô′gĭng, lŏg′ĭng)
n.
The work or business of felling and trimming trees and transporting the logs to a mill.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

logging

(ˈlɒɡɪŋ)
n
(Forestry) the work of felling, trimming, and transporting timber
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

log•ging

(ˈlɔ gɪŋ, ˈlɒg ɪŋ)

n.
the process, work, or business of cutting down trees and transporting the logs to sawmills.
[1700–10]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.logging - the work of cutting down trees for timberlogging - the work of cutting down trees for timber
work - activity directed toward making or doing something; "she checked several points needing further work"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

logging

[ˈlɒgɪŋ] Nexplotación f forestal
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

logging

[ˈlɒgɪŋ] nexploitation f forestière logging companylogging company ncompagnie f d'exploitation forestière
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

logging

nHolzfällen nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

logging

[ˈlɒgɪŋ] ndisboscamento
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Ken Shields, Conifex's Chair and CEO, stated: ""We have known for some time that lumber industry rationalization is inevitable because too little sawlog supply is available to maintain the existing manufacturing base in the Interior region of BC.
The National Register nomination for the building noted that the lumber industry was an important economic engine in Craighead County during the 19th and early 20th centuries.
Most of the softwood lumber industry in North America still thinks of itself as a bulk producer of low-value commodity wood.
Yet the lumber industry has endured through changes in building materials and construction -- so it's no surprise that insurers long ago spotted an opportunity to cover the lumber industry, historically subject to serious fire losses.
But, in reality, a number of factors, not the least of which was restrictions placed on federal lands because of the Endangered Species Act, has fed a torrent of change in Oregon's lumber industry.
It is this that worries the lumber industry even more than the direct effect of the tariffs.
Friends said the altar was built partly to pay tribute to the lumber industry, which has been a major contributor to the economy of the Caraga region.
It seems to be mirroring the lumber industry as a whole, and following last year's gain of 20%, wood siding is now in line with other lumber products.
Five substantive chapters organize the material thematically or topically: berrying, commercialized hunting and trapping, fishing, work in the lumber industry, and tourist colonialism.
The temperate rain forests on the North America's Pacific Northwest were a new phenomenon to professional foresters, says science and environment historian Brock, and the science of forestry had to develop new practices and understandings in order to keep pace with the rapid growth of lumber industry feeding on Douglas fir forests, which began early in the 20th century.
The process is highly visible, and one agency estimates that 90 percent of logging in Mozambique is illegal, but payments to officials ensure that the unregulated lumber industry is sheltered from legal action.