Lutheranism


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Lu·ther·an

 (lo͞o′thər-ən)
adj.
1. Of or relating to the religious doctrines of Martin Luther, especially the doctrine of justification by faith alone.
2. Of or relating to the Protestant denomination adhering to these doctrines.
n.
A member of the Lutheran Church.

Lu′ther·an·ism, Lu′ther·ism n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Lutheranism

1. the religious doctrines and church polity of Martin Luther, 16th-century German theologian, author, and leader of the Protestant Reformation.
2. adherence to these doctrines or membership in the Lutheran Church. — Lutheran, n., adj.
See also: Protestantism
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lutheranism - teachings of Martin Luther emphasizing the cardinal doctrine of justification by faith alone
Protestantism - the theological system of any of the churches of western Christendom that separated from the Roman Catholic Church during the Reformation
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Lutheranism

[ˈluːθərənɪzəm] Nluteranismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Lutheranism

nLuthertum nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Lutheranism

[ˈluːθrənɪzm] nluteranesimo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
All these values are also core values in my religion, Christian Lutheranism, and other world religions, which should unite us all globally.
Focusing here on Lawrence's mission to the Holy Roman Empire at the beginning of the 17th century, he covers Lawrence of Brindisi's career and afterlife, the foundation of the Commissariate of Bohemia-Austria-Styria, polemical preaching, theological disputation, and The Express Image of Lutheranism. ([umlaut] Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR)
He was reinstated to the Evangelical Lutheran Church in 2010, a sect which is considered to be the most tolerant of the LGBT community within Lutheranism.
Traditional hymns in Lutheranism for Epiphany are: "Songs of Thankfulness and Praise," "As with Gladness Men of Old," "Brightest and Best of the Stars of the Morning," and "The People That in Darkness Sat."
And how did the development of Lutheranism on the continent shape what would become the Anglican faith?
Marissen further clarifies that he is not primarily concerned with Bach's life or beliefs in relation to Christianity (in particular, Lutheranism), but rather with the ways Bach's music communicates, and interprets, theological ideas.
Lutheranism in Norway remained quite strong in the early to mid-twentieth century.
Pietism was a movement within Lutheranism that began in the late 17th century, reached its zenith in the mid-18th century, and declined through the 19th century, and had almost vanished in America by the end of the 20th century.
Trying to affiliate its purpose to any sort of religious idealism is akin to saying that Adolph Hitler was a Christian democrat on the grounds of Germany's then still bold attachment to Lutheranism.
I will proceed in a series of concentric circles, from my experience growing up Lutheran primarily in the United States through some of my experiences of global Lutheranism and finally offering some convictions regarding our place and role as Lutheran Christians in the world today.
interacts positively with multiple Catholic sources, but without veering from her concentration on American Lutheranism. For Catholic readers, the book is a treasure trove of references to works in Lutheran and other Protestant ecclesiologies, and is a welcome addition to the growing body of ecclesiological literature that gives priority to the identity of the church as a community for mission.