Lydda


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Related to Lydda: Aeneas, Æneas

Lydda

(ˈlɪdə)
n
(Placename) another name for Lod
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References in periodicals archive ?
On the outskirts of the town of Lydda (known today as Lod), a second airport was built in 1936.
In late 2015, Adalah filed a petition to the Lydda District Court seeking to compel the police to make public sensitive sections of its newly-issued open-fire regulations.
George were taken from Nicomedia (Asia Minor) where he was martyred to Palestine where his mother lived in the ancient town called Lydda (currently the Tel Aviv Airport is next to St.
The narrative is knotted around the 1948 Lydda massacre and, according to early reviews, it is told in Khoury's characteristic, circling style, intertextual with his previous novels, as Sinalcol was, using his fictional worlds — particularly, in this case, Gate of the Sun, to stand on his own shoulders.
Whereas China is a convenient distance away, a Palestinian assassinated in the heart of Europe is inconveniently close, part of a history in which we are implicated (a powerful video piece in the exhibition is based at Lydda airport --today Ben Gurion--built by the British in the 1930s).
Consider the case of Lydda and Ramleh, the twin cities in Palestine lying outside the area designated for a Jewish state in the UN Partition Plan of 1947.
His dad was Greek, his mother was from Palestine and he was born in Lydda, Syria.
In 1979, an Israeli censorship committee chaired by the justice minister deleted five evocative paragraphs from Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin's memoir: his first-person account of the expulsion of Arab residents from the towns of Lydda and Ramie during Israel's War of Independence in 1947-49.
I wrote a feature on this 11 long years ago, at a time when more and more people were organising events in honour of the man "born in Lydda, Roman Palestine, who was a soldier in the Roman army and later venerated as a Christian martyr (he died in 303 AD)" - yes, Wikipedia again.
Summary: In the early days of May 1972, the world turned its eyes to Tel Aviv, where four Fedayeen had hijacked a Belgian airliner, forcing its captain to land at Lydda Airport (now Ben-Gurion International Airport).
Asi lo reconocen desde hace decadas las voces liberales de Israel, como Ari Shavit, que en Mi tierra prometida --su reciente libro, esclarecedor y doloroso--documenta puntualmente casos como el de la aldea palestina de Lydda, arrasada en 1948, asiento actual del aeropuerto de Lod.
He looks clearly at how early Zionists, fired by desire for a homeland, overlooked and later displaced the Arabs who already lived in Palestine; he recounts his military duty in a Gaza prison camp and pieces together the story of the destruction of the Arab town of Lydda in 1948.