Lyonnesse

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Lyonnesse

(ˌlaɪəˈnɛs)
n
(European Myth & Legend) (in Arthurian legend) the mythical birthplace of Sir Tristram, situated in SW England and believed to have been submerged by the sea

Ly•on•nesse

(ˌlaɪ əˈnɛs)
n.
(in Arthurian legend) a country near Cornwall in SW England, supposed to have been submerged by the sea.
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References in classic literature ?
'Tristram of Lyonesse.' His chief importance, however, is as a lyric poet, and his lyric production was large.
Similarly outlandish traditional stories from the UK and France hint at the locations of rumoured sunken settlements such as Ys and Lyonesse. 'With hindsight there is no doubt that science, especially in its younger days, could have benefited from treating oral tradition and knowledge more seriously,' notes Nunn.
Applying Simon Jarvis's theory of "verse thinking" to Swinburne's Songs before Sunrise, Studies in Song (1880), and Tristram of Lyonesse (1882), Saville argues that Swinburne's sound patterns express "a counterintuitive form of thinking" that unsettles habituated thought, leads to unexpected meanings, and expresses the counterintuitive, "nonrational knowledge" of the soul (p.
Belerion encompasses, or at least adjoins, the site of Tennyson's Lyonesse, that "land of old upheaven from the abyss" (in Morte Darthur), then downheaven again.
Dame Lynette, trying to keep Sir Gareth from consummating his love to Dame Lyonesse before they are married, conjures up a knight that attacks Sir Gareth throughout the night.
(3) Margot Louis describes Swinburne's representation in Tristram of Lyonesse of "a diffuse sexuality marked by multiple centers of pleasure.
(3) Algernon Charles Swinburne, "Thomas Middleton" published in Tristram of Lyonesse and Other Poems (1882).
Despite the discovery of Lyonesse, the lost underwater city, sliding panels in draughty Cornish mansions, ferocious humanoid gill-men and an impressive underwater earthquake as a climax, the movie was tame stuff by previous standards of suspense (McAsh 2009: 23).
The accompaniment is reminiscent of "When I set out for Lyonesse." "Epeisodia" is full of alliteration, so the singer needs to provide crisp consonants and a supple lower end for the B section.
It follows The Well of the Worlds in the 'Monsters of Lyonesse' series, continuing the story of Idris Limpet, 13-year-old King of Lyonnesse.
So to discover what it takes to bring the catch of the day to your dinner table the Mirror's STEVE MYALL joined the crew of the fishing boat Lyonesse for a tough night off the Cornish coast.
Sam Llewellyn's LYONESSE: THE WELL BETWEEN THE WORLDS (0439934699, $17.99) tells of a land before King Arthur, where a sword is plunged in a stone.