MEMS

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MEMS

 (mĕmz)
n.
1. (used with a sing. verb) A technology that combines tiny electronic and mechanical parts to create systems with moving parts on a scale ranging from microns to a millimeter, typically using silicon or silicon-based fabrication methods.
2. (used with a pl. verb) Devices, machines, or systems fabricated using this technology.

[m(icro)e(lectro)m(echanical) s(ystems).]

MEMS adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
These use two-dimensional MEMS mirror arrays to steer optical beams in free space and provide a level of network automation at a purely optical layer.
Harris, "Standing-wave transform spectrometer based on integrated MEMS mirror and thin-film photodetector," IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics, vol.
The controller and MEMS mirror will be packaged together, but this system will not be available from Innoluce until about 2020.
Further, the LiDAR market may also be classified based on its components such as the inertial navigation system, GPS/GNSS, laser diode, camera and MEMS mirror.
It adopts a LBS system that incorporates a semiconductor laser as the source of light, whereby the laser beam is reflected and controlled by a MEMS mirror to scan and project the image.
The researchers were able to shrink what has been typically a large instrument into a portable size by using a MEMS mirror to scan the OCT imaging beam.
The DSP allows high-speed raster scanning of the incident radiation, which is focused to a small waist onto the 9mm (2), gold-coated, MEMS mirror surface, while simultaneously acquiring an undistorted, high spatial-resolution image of an object.
Rapid switching: A notch filter (i.e., a filter that eliminates a specified narrow bandwidth frequency from a signal consisting of frequencies of a given bandwidth) in the MEMS mirror serves to suppress the mechanical resonance (a phenomenon whereby the input of an external signal at a certain frequency induces strong vibrations) that normally occurs when switching the optical signal.
Past lidar solutions have included bulky spinning assemblies, while newer breeds make use of MEMS mirrors or optical phased arrays.