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met

 (mĕt)
v.
Past tense and past participle of meet1.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

met

(mɛt)
vb
the past tense and past participle of meet1

Met

(mɛt)
n
1. (Law) (in Britain) the Metropolitan Police Force: the main police force serving London
2. (Named Buildings) the Metropolitan Museum of Art (in New York)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

met

(mɛt)

v.
pt. and pp. of meet 1 .

Met

methionine.

met-

var. of meta- before a vowel: metempsychosis.

met.

1. metaphor.
2. metaphysics.
3. meteorological; meteorology.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

Met

n (inf)
(US) abbr of Metropolitan Opera CompanyMetropolitan (Oper) f
(US) abbr of Metropolitan Museum of Art Kunstmuseum in New York
(Brit) abbr of Metropolitan Police
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Pickwick among the number, met each other in the pump room, took their quarter of a pint, and walked constitutionally.
Conway spoke of this agreement, I met him one day, walking slowly down Montgomery street, apparently, from his abstracted air, in deep thought.
It was only at dusk, when the place was ours, and after General Baird himself had found the dead body of Tippoo under a heap of the slain, that Herncastle and I met.
I met my mates in the morning (and, oh, but I am old!) Where roaring on the ledges the summer ground-swell rolled; I heard them lift the chorus that drowned the breakers' song-- The Beaches of Lukannon--two million voices strong.
Thus to revert to memory: A memory is "vague" when it is appropriate to many different occurrences: for instance, "I met a man" is vague, since any man would verify it.
He met the fox, who gave him the good advice: but when he came to the two inns, his eldest brother was standing at the window where the merrymaking was, and called to him to come in; and he could not withstand the temptation, but went in, and forgot the golden bird and his country in the same manner.
They met a good many acquaintances; Mainhall, indeed, knew almost every one, and he babbled on incontinently, screwing his small head about over his high collar.
"You have met him, Aunt?" said she in a calm voice, unable herself to understand that she could be outwardly so calm and natural.
The young man stood looking about him with the dazed air of the foreigner flung upon the harsh mercies of American travel; then he advanced toward Archer, lifted his hat, and said in English: "Surely, Monsieur, we met in London?"
"I have met Lord Romsey and also Madame Selarne," he observed.
Our fathers then imagined they had nothing more to fear, but too soon were convinced of their error, for they found the whole country turned against them, and met everywhere new enemies to contend with and new dangers to surmount.
In point of fact, I met Strickland before I had been a fortnight in Paris.