flops

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flops

 (flŏps) or flop (flŏp)
n. pl. flops
A measure of the speed of a computer in operations per second, especially arithmetic operations involving floating-point numbers. Often used in combination: gigaflops; teraflop.

[f(loating-)p(oint) o(perations) p(er) s(econd). Variant flop, back-formation from flops.]

flops

or

FLOPS

n acronym for
(Computer Science) floating-point operations per second: used as a measure of computer processing power (in combination with a prefix): megaflops; gigaflops.

flops

(flɒps)
n.
a measure of computer speed, equal to the number of floating-point operations the computer can perform per second.
[1985–90; fl(oating-point) op(erations per) s(econd)]
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Kwok Kai Choong, President and Chief Executive Officer of Keppel FELS Brasil, shared, "We appreciate our growing ties with MTOPS, MODEC and TOYO.
During the Clinton Administration, HPC export thresholds--or the amount of MTOPS capability that an HPC would need to require a license--were raised several times.
They had been required to gain the department's permission when exporting products with a processing speed of more than 85,000 MTOPS to the Tier 3 countries, which also include India, Israel and Pakistan.
For example, it changes the composite theoretical performance (CTP) control parameter for certain microprocessors from 3,500 million theoretical operations per second (MTOPS) to 6,500 MTOPS.
5 MTOPS computer was a commonly available machine running on the now-ancient Intel 486 chip.
Tier 2 countries (South America apart from Brazil, South Korea, ASEAN, Slovenia and South Africa still require individual licenses above 20,000 MTOPS (millions of theoretical operations per second).
D, vice chairman, Department of Urology at Columbia University Medical Center, and MTOPS study investigator.
In January 2002, the President announced that the control threshold above which computers exported to countries such as China, India, and Russia would increase from 85,000 millions of theoretical operations per second (MTOPS) to 190,000 MTOPS.