agar

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a·gar

 (ā′gär′, ä′gär′) also a·gar-a·gar (ā′gär-ā′gär′, ä′gär-ä′-)
n.
1. A gelatinous material derived from certain marine algae. It is used as a base for bacterial culture media and as a stabilizer and thickener in many food products.
2. A culture medium containing this material.

[Short for Malay agar-agar.]

agar

(ˈeɪɡə)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a complex gelatinous carbohydrate obtained from seaweeds, esp those of the genus Gelidium, used as a culture medium for bacteria, a laxative, in food such as ice cream as a thickening agent (E406), etc. Also called: agar-agar
[C19: Malay]

a•gar

(ˈɑ gɑr, ˈæg ər)

n.
1. Also, a′gar-a′gar.a gel prepared from the cell walls of various red algae, used in laboratories as a culture medium, in food processing as a thickener and stabilizer, and in industry as a filler, adhesive, etc.
2. a culture medium having an agar base.
[1885–90; < Malay agaragar]

a·gar

(ā′gär′, ä′gär′)
A jelly-like material obtained from marine algae, especially seaweed. It is used as a medium for growing bacterial cultures in the laboratory and as a thickener and stabilizer in food products.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.agar - any culture medium that uses agar as the gelling agentagar - any culture medium that uses agar as the gelling agent
culture medium, medium - (bacteriology) a nutrient substance (solid or liquid) that is used to cultivate micro-organisms
agar-agar, agar - a colloidal extract of algae; used especially in culture media and as a gelling agent in foods
blood agar - a culture medium containing whole blood as the nutrient
2.agar - a colloidal extract of algaeagar - a colloidal extract of algae; used especially in culture media and as a gelling agent in foods
gum - any of various substances (soluble in water) that exude from certain plants; they are gelatinous when moist but harden on drying
agar, nutrient agar - any culture medium that uses agar as the gelling agent
Translations
agar

agar

[ˈeɪgəʳ] agar-agar [ˌeɪgərˈeɪgəʳ] nagar-agar m inv
References in periodicals archive ?
Briefly, samples were smeared on blood agar and MacConkey agar plates and incubated at 37AdegC for 24 hours.
nutrient medium macconkey agar 1,5 kg, indicated by the participants2.
Samples were processed and cultivated under aerobic and microaerobic conditions in 5% sheep blood agar and MacConkey agar, and incubated for 72h at 37[degrees]C.
Swarming of P mirabilis can also be inhibited on media like Deoxycholate citrate agar (DCA) and MacConkey agar which contains bile salts.
The organisms did not grow on MacConkey agar or when incubated anaerobically on blood agar.
For the routine culture, the aspirate was plated to sheep blood agar, chocolate agar, MacConkey agar, mannitol salt agar and esculin agar, along with a thioglycollate broth.
The other portion of the sample was inoculated on Nutrient, Blood and MacConkey agar media and incubated aerobically at 37[degrees]C for 24 hours.
Two culture media were used in this experiment: blood agar (Oxoid Ltd., Basingstoke, and Hampshire, United Kingdom) and MacConkey agar (Oxoid).
Material and Methods: All specimens were inoculated on blood and macConkey agar, incubated aerobically at 35AoC - 37AoC for 18 to 24 hours.
Plate media (tryptic soy agar [TSA], blood agar, Sabouraud agar, and MacConkey agar) were inoculated by rolling the swabs over approximately 20% of the medium surface--the "initial inoculum area." Sterile, disposable plastic loops were used to streak in parallel lines from that initial inoculum area into three other quadrants of the medium surface.
Price and his colleagues looked at "different conditions, multiple volumes of urine, different plates, 24 versus 48 hours--and at the end tried to figure out what is the least amount of work you can do to get the most information." They then developed a streamlined protocol that involves 100 mcL of urine, a CNA agar plate that selects for gram-positive organisms, a MacConkey agar using 5% C02, and 48 hours of incubation.
The faecal specimens from healthy individuals, patients, sewage sludge, cattle, chickens and raw meat (n = 122) were processed for microbiological analysis using MacConkey agar supplemented with cefotaxime.