MacGuffin


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MacGuffin

Also: McGuffin
an object, event, or character in a story that lacks intrinsic importance but serves to set and keep the plot in motion

Mac·Guf·fin

(mə-gŭf′fĭn)
n.
An object in a work of fiction, especially in film, whose only purpose is to advance the plot.

[Popularized by Alfred Hitchcock and possibly coined by British screenwriter Angus MacPhail (1903-1962), after a joke about a MacGuffin, a nonexistent device for trapping lions (or tigers) in the Scottish Highlands, from the surname MacGuffin.]
Word History: Alfred Hitchcock popularized the word MacGuffin in screenwriting jargon to describe any object that advances plot, usually because the characters desire to acquire or protect it. One such example is the titular statuette in Hitchcock's film The Maltese Falcon. MacGuffin may have been coined by British screenwriter Angus MacPhail (1903-1962). The word is thought to be a reference to a joke. In one version of the joke, two people are riding on a train. When one asks the other what's inside a strange case, the owner of the mysterious case replies that inside is a MacGuffin. "What's a MacGuffin?" says the first person. The owner answers that it's a device for trapping lions in the Scottish Highlands. "But," says the curious traveler, "There are no lions in the Scottish Highlands!" To which the owner says, "Well, then that's no MacGuffin!" (Some versions of the joke refer to tigers instead of lions.) MacGuffins are a common storytelling device. Further examples include the one ring in J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings trilogy, the briefcase in Pulp Fiction, and the Holy Grail in numerous films and novels.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.MacGuffin - (film) a plot element that catches the viewers' attention or drives the plot; "the McGuffin was a key element of Alfred Hitchcock's films"
plot element - a component or element of the plot of a story
cinema, film, celluloid - a medium that disseminates moving pictures; "theater pieces transferred to celluloid"; "this story would be good cinema"; "film coverage of sporting events"
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, the virus simply serves as a macguffin to kick-start a story more interested in insane chases, slick CGI stunts, juvenile insults, and lighthearted depictions of torture and violence that have become the hallmarks of the "Fast & Furious" franchise.
The storyline is nominally concerned with the Staff of Moses, a relic which actually exists and functions here as a Hitchcockian MacGuffin, but the action tumbles along at breakneck speed, so fast that it is difficult sometimes to keep up with the plot.
Fortunately, Forky, like the MacGuffin in Alfred Hitchcock's films, only seems to be what 'Toy Story 4' is about.
Thank You Ronnie Screwvala & RSVP Movies Macguffin pictures, Radhika."
Utilizing what initially seemed to be a MacGuffin, the film's ending clearly indicates this is meant to be the start of a new cycle of films and a new direction for the franchise.
Mostly these motivations are what Alfred Hitchcock called the MacGuffin, an explanation for the struggle but not really of interest in itself--like the uranium in Notorious, or the stolen payroll in Psycho.
The Force was a "Kiber Crystal," a red MacGuffin at the centre of the conflict with mystical powers.
GirardAEs mimetic theory is presented as an alternative to Freudian and Lacanian theory for examining the violence in HitchcockAEs films and themes such as the innocent victim, the wrong man, the scapegoat, and the MacGuffin. The films discussed are: The Birds, Shadow of a Doubt, Rope, Strangers on a Train, The Wrong Man, Vertigo, and Psycho.
Review, Existere, The MacGuffin, Pennsylvania English, and Watershed
That was the genius of the first Iron Man movie--the macguffin, nerds will recall, was the "arc reactor," a fantastically small source of huge amounts of power.
When I emerged from this show, feeling that I hadn't sunk beneath its systemic surfaces, the nameless aspect began to feel like a MacGuffin or an unexamined piety.