MacLeish


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Mac·Leish

 (mĭk-lēsh′), Archibald 1892-1982.
American poet who served as Librarian of Congress (1939-1944) and assistant secretary of state (1944-1945). He won a Pulitzer Prize for Conquistador (1932), Collected Poems 1917-1952 (1952), and the verse play J.B. (1958).

Macleish

(məˈkliːʃ)
n
(Biography) Archibald. 1892–1982, US poet and public official; his works include Collected Poems (1952) and J.B. (1958)

Mac•Leish

(mækˈliʃ, məˈkliʃ)

n.
Archibald, 1892–1982, U.S. poet.
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Noun1.MacLeish - United States poet (1892-1982)
References in periodicals archive ?
Correction: What every young person should hate: Dylan the truncated Iliad, meat on the trident harpoon Correction: What every young person should hate: MacLeish A Cuba Libre cocktail with ice, the indivisible self.
He chose the librarian of Congress, Archibald MacLeish, to direct the Office of Facts and Figures, established on October 24, 1941.
Wells and Atwood learned that Nestor Lozano (George Tchortov), also known as Catalan, is alive even though the then President Peter MacLeish (Ashley Zukerman) ordered Navy SEALS to shoot him.
The American poet and writer Archibald MacLeish wrote those lines just before World War II, when lying carried the risk of a far greater censure in the public sphere than it does now, especially among politicians.
In the play, MacLeish advocates for an actively interventionist radio.
MacLeish held the exalted title of Bolyston Professor of Rhetoric and Oratory at Harvard and was at a second peak of his fame, having been the Librarian of Congress and having won the Pulitzer Prize three times, most recently the previous year for his verse drama "J.
That support came in 1940 when MacLeish secured a $41,520 grant from the Carnegie Corporation to build and maintain a recording laboratory within the LC.
A Pulitzer Prize--winning poet and, dating to 1939, the Librarian of Congress, MacLeish was a reluctant propagandist at best.
The most provocative moment in the conclusion is the brief discussion of the 1940 public rumble between Archibald MacLeish and Hemingway in the pages of the New Republic and Life in which MacLeish accuses writers of the Great War disillusionment novels like Hemingway of "'hav[ing] done more to disarm democracy in the face of fascism than any other single influence'" (141).
Bridgewater State is a prison accredited as a behavioral health care provider, not a hospital, and it is ill-equipped to deliver adequate mental health care, especially when patients are severely mentally ill, said Roderick MacLeish, a lawyer for the plaintiffs.
Contributors included Walter Lippmann, Billy Graham, the poet Archibald MacLeish, and two-time presidential nominee Adlai Stevenson.
8221; The keynote speaker, Paul Macleish, presented “The Braveheart Approach to Leadership,” and began the afternoon session playing bagpipes and wearing a kilt.