MacNeice


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MacNeice

(məkˈniːs)
n
(Biography) Louis. 1907–63, British poet, born in Northern Ireland. His works include Autumn Journal (1939) and Solstices (1961) and a translation of Agamemnon (1936)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Mac•Neice

(məkˈnis)

n.
Louis, 1907–63, Irish poet.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Referee: Mathieu Reynal (France) Touch judges: Pascal Gauzere (France), Alex Ruiz (France) TV match official: Brian MacNeice (Ireland) TV: Sky Sports Action, 1pm
Reynal (France) Referee: Mathieu Reynal (France) Touch judges: Pascal Gauzere (France), Alex Ruiz (France) TV match official: Brian MacNeice (Ireland) TV: Sky Sports Action, 1pm
After performing in the classical Greek section, Soraya will present a contemporary ballet piece in classical character to a Second World War poem by Louis MacNeice.
Also in attendance for the exclusive launch were Michele McGrath, Roz Lipsett, Emily O'Donnell, Clementine MacNeice and Sinead O'Brien.
Tom Walker is the author of Louis MacNeice and the Irish Poetry of His Time (Oxford University Press).
A fracas had resulted in the methodical Neville consulting television match official Brian MacNeice and viewing the big screen at Rodney Parade before calmly reaching her decision.
The Curnow who presents some striking parallels with and contrasts to his Anglo-Irish contemporary Louis MacNeice, who, like Curnow, was the son of a Protestant clergyman and for whom the loss of childhood faith was also a recurrent and resonant subject.
She covers the rhetoric of Irish neutrality, pilgrimage as a poetic form: Kavanagh and Devlin at Lough Derg, the enemy within: Louis MacNeice's war poetry, careful talk: Elizabeth Bowen and language at war, unreadable books and unspeakable worlds: Beckett and O'Brien in purgatory, and the Emergency's Improbably Frequency.
When I was at Oxford I met Louis MACNEICE. For a while I ran Oxford's Poetry Society, OUPS, and got to choose the poets who read to us.
"This man with the shy smile...." This poem concerns a colleague of MacNeice who jumped to his death from his office window.
Rory MacNeice, representing the jockeys, argued that the first two flagmen were so far from the inner chase track as to add nothing to the efforts to stop the race.
Yeats, together with Louis MacNeice, a younger Protestant poet.