macadam

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Related to Macadamising: Macadam road

mac·ad·am

 (mə-kăd′əm)
n.
Pavement made of layers of compacted broken stone, now usually bound with asphalt.

[After John Loudon McAdam (1756-1836), Scottish civil engineer.]

macadam

(məˈkædəm)
n
(Civil Engineering) a road surface made of compressed layers of small broken stones, esp one that is bound together with tar or asphalt
[C19: named after John McAdam (1756–1836), Scottish engineer, the inventor]

mac•ad•am

(məˈkæd əm)

n.
1. a macadamized road or pavement.
2. the broken stone used for macadamizing.
[1815–25; after J. Latin. McAdam (1756–1836), Scottish engineer, who invented the process]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.macadam - broken stone used in macadamized roadwaysmacadam - broken stone used in macadamized roadways
paving, paving material, pavement - material used to pave an area
2.macadam - a paved surface having compressed layers of broken rocks held together with tarmacadam - a paved surface having compressed layers of broken rocks held together with tar
paved surface - a level horizontal surface covered with paving material
Translations

macadam

[məˈkædəm] Nmacadán m

macadam

nSchotter m, → Splitt m, → Makadam m or nt; macadam roadSchotterstraße f

macadam

[məˈkædəm] nmacadam m
References in periodicals archive ?
He told Al-Shorouq Arabic daily that bitumen used heavily for macadamising has shot up in price fivefold whereas fuel oil has almost doubled its price in a period of two months.
On 22 December 1862, amid tenders for the "grading and macadamising of Yates and Johnson streets," the city targeted Indigenous women specifically, with a motion for a "bye-law declaring it to be unlawful for any person to harbour Indian women within the city limits." (87) The motion continued, "It is expedient to take measures for improving the sanitary conditions of the city of Victoria ...
Between 1839 and 1846, the Commissioners planned and undertook further works, including the widening and macadamising of Commissioners Street and the building of four new 'finger piers' [Nelson (1839-1840), Wellington (1839-1840), Russel (1845-1846) and Victoria (1845-1846)].