macaque

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Related to Macaque monkey: Rhesus Macaque Monkey

ma·caque

 (mə-kăk′, -käk′)
n.
Any of a diverse group of monkeys of the genus Macaca of Asia, Gibraltar, and northern Africa, and including the Barbary ape and the rhesus monkey.

[French, from Portuguese macaco, of Bantu origin; akin to Kongo makako, monkeys : ma-, pl. n. pref. + -kako, monkey.]

macaque

(məˈkɑːk)
n
(Animals) any of various Old World monkeys of the genus Macaca, inhabiting wooded or rocky regions of Asia and Africa. Typically the tail is short or absent and cheek pouches are present
[C17: from French, from Portuguese macaco, from Fiot (a W African language) makaku, from kaku monkey]

ma•caque

(məˈkæk, -ˈkɑk)

n.
any monkey of the genus Macaca, chiefly of Asia, characterized by cheek pouches and usu. a short tail.
[1690–1700; < French < Portuguese macaco monkey]

macaque

- Based on Bantu kaku, "monkey," and ma, denoting a plural, translating to "some monkeys."
See also related terms for monkeys.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.macaque - short-tailed monkey of rocky regions of Asia and Africamacaque - short-tailed monkey of rocky regions of Asia and Africa
catarrhine, Old World monkey - of Africa or Arabia or Asia; having nonprehensile tails and nostrils close together
genus Macaca, Macaca - macaques; rhesus monkeys
Macaca mulatta, rhesus, rhesus monkey - of southern Asia; used in medical research
bonnet macaque, bonnet monkey, capped macaque, crown monkey, Macaca radiata - Indian macaque with a bonnet-like tuft of hair
Barbary ape, Macaca sylvana - tailless macaque of rocky cliffs and forests of northwestern Africa and Gibraltar
crab-eating macaque, croo monkey, Macaca irus - monkey of southeast Asia, Borneo and the Philippines
Translations

macaque

n (monkey) → Makak m

macaque

[məˈkɑːk] n (animal) → macaco
References in periodicals archive ?
Washington, Sept 30 (ANI): A new study has shown that a rhesus macaque monkey can recognize itself in the mirror and perform actions that scientists would expect from animals that have self-awareness.
But the 85-strong rhesus macaque monkey colony munched the lot.
And a black macaque monkey seemed to know exactly what it was doing after borrowing a photographer's camera and smiling for a superb self-portrait in North Sulawesi, Indonesia.
A quizzical macaque monkey leers at the cameraman in Indonesia; This 70-ton southern right whale dwarfs a diver off the Auckland Islands; Cameraman Steve Winter waited 10 months to get this shot of a reclusive snow leopard in the Indian mountains; A treefrog grips a cat-eyed treesnake as they lock jaws in an epic fight to the death in Belize, Central America; A snowstorm is a perfect backdrop as white-tailed eagles fight over food in Poland
This 70-ton southern right whale dwarfs a diver off the Auckland Islands; A treefrog grips a cateyed treesnake as they lock jaws in an epic fight to the death in Belize, Central America; A snowstorm is a perfect backdrop as white-tailed eagles fight over food in Poland; Cameraman Steve Winter waited 10 months to get this shot of a reclusive snow leopard in the Indian mountains; A quizzical macaque monkey leers at the cameraman in Indonesia
Steiper of Hunter College of the City University of New York and his colleagues first consulted the latest fossil evidence to estimate that the human evolutionary family separated from chimps' ancestors between 6 million and 7 million years ago, while the macaque monkey lineage diverged from its baboon ancestors between 5 million and 7 million years ago.
Fresh Water was, he said, "rich with surprise" - a phrase that didn't really do justice to images such a macaque monkey swimming underwater, bombing along with a dolphin.
Further trials presented pairs of macaque monkey faces, one of which had just been seen.
Government health experts launched a nationwide inquiry three weeks ago after a young girl died in the US as a result of contracting the virus from being spat at by a macaque monkey.
In the eternal search for understanding what makes us human, scientists found that our brains are more sensitive to pitch, the harmonic sounds we hear when listening to music, than our evolutionary relative the macaque monkey. The study, funded in part by the National Institutes of Health, highlights the promise of Sound Health, a joint project between the NIH and the John F.
This season, Evan also runs across jealous rhinos in Kenya, and dashes to Sri Lanka to assist a Macaque monkey in need of help.
RESEARCHERS FROM THE Institute of Neuroscience of Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai, China, have recently announced the birth of five gene-edited macaque monkey clones, the first step towards the development of customized uniformly genetic, gene edited nonhuman primate models for use in biomedical research.