Macaulay


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Ma·cau·lay

 (mə-kô′lē), Dame Rose 1881-1958.
British writer whose witty, urbane novels include The World My Wilderness (1950) and The Towers of Trebizond (1956).

Macaulay

, Thomas Babington First Baron Macaulay. 1800-1859.
British historian, writer, and politician whose works include the popular History of England (1849-1861), numerous essays for the Edinburgh Review, and a volume of narrative poems, Lays of Ancient Rome (1842).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Macaulay

(məˈkɔːlɪ)
n
1. (Biography) Dame Rose. 1881–1958, British novelist. Her books include Dangerous Ages (1921) and The Towers of Trebizond (1956)
2. (Biography) Thomas Babington, 1st Baron. 1800–59, English historian, essayist, and statesman. His History of England from the Accession of James the Second (1848–61) is regarded as a classic of the Whig interpretation of history
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ma•cau•lay

(məˈkɔ li)

n.
1. Dame Rose, c1885–1958, English novelist.
2. Thomas Babington, 1st Baron, 1800–59, English historian and statesman.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Macaulay - English historian noted for his history of England (1800-1859)Macaulay - English historian noted for his history of England (1800-1859)
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References in classic literature ?
The dull old letters, which would have turned the heads of the most sober of collectors, were laid upon a table, and, after a moment's pause, Cassandra, looking grave all of a sudden, asked Katharine where she should find the "History of England" by Lord Macaulay. It was downstairs in Mr.
"Must you read Macaulay's History, Cassandra?" Katharine asked, with a stretch of her arms.
"Here's your Macaulay," said Katharine, turning round with the book in her hand.
"Damn Lord Macaulay!" cried Cassandra, slapping the book upon the table.
"I know I shan't be able to settle to Macaulay," said Cassandra, looking ruefully at the dull red cover of the prescribed volume, which, however, possessed a talismanic property, since William admired it.
Do speak your piece to me, I do so like 'Macaulay's Lays.'"
He said he had observed it in Kirkham's grammar and in Macaulay. Harris believed that milk-teeth are commoner in men's mouths than those "doubled-up haves." [1]
He came under the influence of Newman's Apologia; the picturesqueness of the Roman Catholic faith appealed to his esthetic sensibility; and it was only the fear of his father's wrath (a plain, blunt man of narrow ideas, who read Macaulay) which prevented him from 'going over.' When he only got a pass degree his friends were astonished; but he shrugged his shoulders and delicately insinuated that he was not the dupe of examiners.
The intellectual experience of the people was mainly theological and political, as it was everywhere in that day, but there were several among them who had a real love for books, and when they met at the druggist's, as they did every night, to dispute of the inspiration of the Scriptures and the principles of the Free Soil party, the talk sometimes turned upon the respective merits of Dickens and Thackeray, Gibbon and Macaulay, Wordsworth and Byron.
Saintsbury's well-considered Specimens of English Prose Style, from Malory to Macaulay (Kegan Paul), a volume, as we think, which bears fresh witness to the truth of the old remark that it takes a scholar indeed to make a [4] good literary selection, has its motive sufficiently indicated in the very original "introductory essay," which might well stand, along with the best of these extracts from a hundred or more deceased masters of English, as itself a document or standard, in the matter of prose style.
Shakspeare is always present when one reads his book; Macaulay is present when we follow the march of his stately sentences; but the Old Testament writers are hidden from view.
The role of natural capital in our future is the focus of the 42nd TB Macaulay Lecture, Green and Prosperous Land.