Macedon

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Ma·ce·don

 (măs′ĭ-dən, -dŏn′) also Ma·ce·do·nia (măs′ĭ-dō′nē-ə, -dōn′yə)
An ancient kingdom of northern Greece originally occupying territory north of Thessaly and northwest of the Aegean Sea. It was the center of a powerful empire under Philip II and his son Alexander the Great and contributed significantly to the spread of Hellenistic civilization. It became the first Roman province in 146 bc.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Macedon

(ˈmæsɪˌdɒn) or

Macedonia

n
1. (Historical Terms) a region of the S Balkans, now divided among Greece, Bulgaria, and Macedonia (Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia). As a kingdom in the ancient world it achieved prominence under Philip II (359–336 bc) and his son Alexander the Great
2. (Placename) a region of the S Balkans, now divided among Greece, Bulgaria, and Macedonia (Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia). As a kingdom in the ancient world it achieved prominence under Philip II (359–336 bc) and his son Alexander the Great
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Macedon - the ancient kingdom of Philip II and Alexander the Great in the southeastern Balkans that is now divided among modern Macedonia and Greece and BulgariaMacedon - the ancient kingdom of Philip II and Alexander the Great in the southeastern Balkans that is now divided among modern Macedonia and Greece and Bulgaria
Battle of Pydna, Pydna - a major victory by the Romans over the Macedonians in 168 BC; resulted in the downfall of the ancient Macedonian kingdom
Balkan Peninsula, Balkans - a large peninsula in southeastern Europe containing the Balkan Mountain Range
Macedonian - a native or inhabitant of Macedon
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
So, in spite of all these criticisms, and of Polybius' continual effort to induce the senate to show moderation towards subject peoples, Baronowsky still maintains that 'on balance' (this is significantly a recurrent phrase), Polybius admired Roman rule, and was convinced that even after the end of the Macedonian kingdom in 168 BC the Romans "continued to observe moderation and beneficence" (p.
(17) But the situation must have changed sociologically when Philip II addressed the consequences of his expansion of the Macedonian kingdom in the period 359-56, and developed civil and military administrative systems to meet the requirements of the incorporation of the erstwhile semi-autonomous principalities.

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