Mackenzie


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Mac·ken·zie

 (mə-kĕn′zē), Alexander 1822-1892.
Scottish-born Canadian politician who was the first Liberal prime minister of Canada (1873-1878). He established the Supreme Court of Canada and reformed the electoral system.

Mackenzie

(məˈkɛnzɪ)
n
(Placename) a river in NW Canada, in the Northwest Territories and Nunavut, flowing northwest from Great Slave Lake to the Beaufort Sea: the longest river in Canada; navigable in summer. Length: 1770 km (1100 miles)

Mackenzie

(məˈkɛnzɪ)
n
1. (Biography) Sir Alexander. ?1755–1820, Scottish explorer and fur trader in Canada. He explored the Mackenzie River (1789) and was the first European to cross America north of Mexico (1793)
2. (Biography) Alexander. 1822–92, Canadian statesman; first Liberal prime minister (1873–78)
3. (Biography) Sir Compton. 1883–1972, English author. His works include Sinister Street (1913–14) and the comic novel Whisky Galore (1947)
4. (Biography) Sir Thomas. 1854–1930, New Zealand statesman born in Scotland: prime minister of New Zealand (1912)
5. (Biography) William Lyon. 1795–1861, Canadian journalist and politician, born in Scotland. He led an unsuccessful rebellion against the oligarchic Family Compact (1837)

Mac•ken•zie

(məˈkɛn zi)

n.
1. a river in NW Canada, flowing NW from the Great Slave Lake to the Arctic Ocean. 1120 mi. (1800 km) long; with tributaries, 2525 mi. (4065 km) long.
2. a district in the SW Northwest Territories of Canada. 527,490 sq. mi. (1,366,200 sq. km).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mackenzie - Canadian explorer (born in England) who explored the Mackenzie River and who was first to cross North America by land north of Mexico (1764-1820)Mackenzie - Canadian explorer (born in England) who explored the Mackenzie River and who was first to cross North America by land north of Mexico (1764-1820)
2.Mackenzie - a Canadian riverMackenzie - a Canadian river; flows into the Beaufort Sea
Canada - a nation in northern North America; the French were the first Europeans to settle in mainland Canada; "the border between the United States and Canada is the longest unguarded border in the world"
References in classic literature ?
He is also Inspector Mackenzie of Scotland Yard--the very man I sent the message to that night last April.
But," said I, "if that was Mackenzie, who was the fellow you bolted from at Warbeck?
The event was the taking of Captain Mackenzie's head, Captain Mackenzie, at that time, being master of the Minota.
The expedition of Sir Alexander Mackenzie in 1793, across the continent to the Pacific Ocean, which he reached in lat.
When Mackenzie some years subsequently published an account of his expeditions, he suggested the policy of opening an intercourse between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, and forming regular establishments through the interior and at both extremes, as well as along the coasts and islands.
Something distantly martial woke in him; and he thought of Miss Mackenzie, whom he was to meet that day at dinner.
Burges, Duer and Mackenzie, 1843; The French Governess; or, The Embroidered Handkerchief, 1843; Richard Dale, 1843; Wyandotte, 1843; Ned Myers, or Life before the Mast, 1843; Afloat and Ashore (Miles Wallingford, Lucy Hardinge), two series, 1844; Proceedings of the Naval Court-Martial in the Case of Alexander Slidell Mackenzie, etc.
The she-wolf, the young leader on her left, and the one-eyed elder on her right, led their half of the pack down to the Mackenzie River and across into the lake country to the east.
Flushing, as he sat down, advised them to keep their eyes fixed on the left bank, where they would soon pass a clearing, and in that clearing, was a hut where Mackenzie, the famous explorer, had died of fever some ten years ago, almost within reach of civilisation--Mackenzie, he repeated, the man who went farther inland than any one's been yet.
1862, he had, in company with Mackenzie, ascended the river Rovoonia.
I have been several times in the garden with Mackenzie, trying to understand, and make him understand, which of Elizabeth's plants are for Lady Russell.
nearer the pole, has, according to Mackenzie, fifteen land-birds.