Maclura pomifera


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Noun1.Maclura pomifera - small shrubby deciduous yellowwood tree of south central United States having spines, glossy dark green leaves and an inedible fruit that resembles an orangeMaclura pomifera - small shrubby deciduous yellowwood tree of south central United States having spines, glossy dark green leaves and an inedible fruit that resembles an orange; its hard orange-colored wood used for bows by Native Americans; frequently planted as boundary hedge
angiospermous yellowwood - any of various angiospermous trees having yellow wood
References in periodicals archive ?
Anahi Bruno, ACE-inhibitory peptides from bovine caseins released with peptidases from Maclura pomifera latex, Food Res.
Maclura pomifera seeds have high caloric content and could he a valuable food source for animals (Havera and Smith, 1979).
One of the most useful trees that grows on our place is the Osage orange (Maclura pomifera), which here in Kansas is generally called "hedge" or "hedge apple." The tree, once in high demand by the railroads for its dense, decay-resistant wood, was nearly harvested to extinction to supply crossties.
Osage orange (Maclura pomifera (Raf.) Scheid., family Moraceae) trees are considered an invasive species and are common to the mid-western US states [21, 22].
fruit sampled Myrtaceae Psidium cattleianum 1396.0 145 Myrcianthes pungens 655.4 345 Psidium guajaba 7986.9 195 Acca sellowiana 10270.7 373 Eugenia uniflora 162.6 8 Hexachlamis edulis 449.2 25 Ebenaceae Diospyros kaki 2922.3 46 Moraceae Ficus carica 2147.6 40 Maclura pomifera 6359.0 21 Rutaceae Fortunella margaritus 192.2 20 C.
Other plants shown to be repellent to cockroaches include Osage orange (Maclura pomifera), Japanese peppermint (Mentha canadensis), Scotch spearmint (M.
2.5 trace trace Ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia 1.7 trace trace Unidentified legume, Legumaceae 1.7 0.3 0.4 Jack-in-the-pulpit, Arisaema atrorubens 0.8 trace trace Osage orange, Maclura pomifera 0.8 trace trace Green dragon, A.
Howard Burnett responds: The osage-orange (Maclura pomifera) is originally native to the mid-South but has been planted throughout the eastern United States.
This was the Osage orange (Maclura pomifera); the thorny cuttings he sent to Jefferson came from trees transplanted from an Osage Indian village 300 miles to the west.
It lists over twenty names -- including Bodock and Horse Apple -- for "Maclura pomifera": 'The genus name is after William Maclure (1763-1840), an American geologist, while the species epithet pomifera means bearing pommes or apples, in allusion to the large, spherical fruits." Frankly, I wanted to be able to name something more than the gorgeous magnolia trees, which animate the university of Mississippi campus.
Osage orange is unique in that it is monotypic, a genus with only one species, (Maclura pomifera) although at one time there were many species of Maclura.