macrolide

(redirected from Macrolide antibiotics)
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mac·ro·lide

 (măk′rō-līd)
n.
A class of antibiotics that are produced by certain actinomycetes of the genus Streptomyces, are characterized by a large lactone ring linked to one or more sugars, and act by inhibiting protein synthesis.

[German Makrolid : makro-, macro- + L(acton), lactone + -id, -ide.]

macrolide

(ˈmækrəˌlaɪd)
n
any of a class of antibiotic drugs derived from streptomycetes
References in periodicals archive ?
[USPRwire, Mon Aug 26 2019] Macrolide Antibiotics are bacteriostatic in nature with a broad spectrum of activity against many gram-positive bacteria.
[ClickPress, Tue Aug 27 2019] Macrolide Antibiotics are bacteriostatic in nature with a broad spectrum of activity against many gram-positive bacteria.
Macrolide antibiotics, specifically azithromycin, are the first-line treatment for the rapidly growing problem of M.
Possible cardiac adverse effects of therapeutic doses of macrolide antibiotics (azithromycin and clarithromycin) in healthy juvenile rats: biochemical assessment.
Gastrointestinal disturbances, hepatic damages are the common side effects of macrolide antibiotics. Tilmicosin has some diverse side effect.
Researchers in pharmacy and chemistry review recent research and the current understanding of the macrolide antibiotics. They cover the macrolide antibiotics and their semi-synthetic derivatives, the semi-synthetic routes towards better macrolide antibiotics, interaction of macrolides with their biological targets, and hybrids of macrolides and nucleobases or nucleosides: synthetic strategies and biological results.
The bacterium Chlamydia pneumonia is known to be present in atherosclerotic plaques, and macrolide antibiotics will eradicate C.
Macrolide resistant bacteria is rapidly increasing in conjunction with the usage of macrolide antibiotics in Japan, and the macrolide resistance rate increased from 10% to 35% in adults from 2008 to 2011 [8].
The effect of changes in the consumption of macrolide antibiotics on erythromycin resistance in group A streptococci in Finland.
Macrolides exert antibacterial properties by inhibiting bacterial protein synthesis by interaction with 50S subunit in the 70S prokaryotic ribosome, and some macrolide antibiotics including azithromycin and clarithromycin share similar interactions with the 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) found in the 50S subunit, stimulating the dissociation of peptidyl-tRNA from bacterial ribosome [74,75].
Pneumoniae isolates in the US display in vitro resistance to macrolide antibiotics. This resistance has developed via 2 separate mechanisms: