villain

(redirected from Mad doctor)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.

vil·lain

 (vĭl′ən)
n.
1. A wicked or evil person; a scoundrel.
2. A dramatic or fictional character who is typically at odds with the hero.
3. (also vĭl′ān′, vĭ-lān′) Variant of villein.
4. Something said to be the cause of particular trouble or an evil: poverty, the villain in the increase of crime.
5. Obsolete A peasant regarded as vile and brutish.

[Middle English vilein, feudal serf, person of coarse feelings, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *vīllānus, feudal serf, from Latin vīlla, country house; see weik- in Indo-European roots.]

villain

(ˈvɪlən)
n
1. a wicked or malevolent person
2. (in a novel, play, film, etc) the main evil character and antagonist to the hero
3. often jocular a mischievous person; rogue
4. police slang Brit a criminal
5. (Historical Terms) history a variant spelling of villein
6. obsolete an uncouth person; boor
[C14: from Old French vilein serf, from Late Latin vīllānus worker on a country estate, from Latin: villa]
ˈvillainess fem n

vil•lain

(ˈvɪl ən)

n.
1. a cruelly malicious person who is involved in or devoted to wickedness or crime; scoundrel.
2. a character in a play, novel, or the like, who constitutes an important evil agency in the plot.
[1275–1325; < Middle French < Late Latin villānus a farm servant]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.villain - a wicked or evil personvillain - a wicked or evil person; someone who does evil deliberately
unwelcome person, persona non grata - a person who for some reason is not wanted or welcome
blackguard, bounder, cad, hound, heel, dog - someone who is morally reprehensible; "you dirty dog"
gallows bird - a person who deserves to be hanged
knave, rapscallion, rascal, rogue, varlet, scalawag, scallywag - a deceitful and unreliable scoundrel
villainess - a woman villain
2.villain - the principal bad character in a film or work of fictionvillain - the principal bad character in a film or work of fiction
persona, theatrical role, role, character, part - an actor's portrayal of someone in a play; "she played the part of Desdemona"

villain

noun
1. evildoer, criminal, rogue, profligate, scoundrel, wretch, libertine, knave (archaic), reprobate, miscreant, malefactor, blackguard, rapscallion, caitiff (archaic) As a copper, I've spent my life putting villains like him away.
2. baddy (informal), antihero Darth Vader, the villain of the Star Wars trilogy
baddy hero, heroine, goody

villain

noun
A mean, worthless character in a story or play:
Slang: heavy.
Translations
نَذْل، وَغْدوَغْد
darebákzlosyn
skurkslyngel
roisto
negativac
òorpari
悪党
악한
nelietis
zlosyn
hudobnež
skurk
ตัวชั่วร้าย
hainkötü adam
kẻ ác

villain

[ˈvɪlən] N
1. (= wrongdoer) → maleante mf, delincuente mf
2. (hum) (= rascal) → bribón/ona m/f, tunante/a m/f
3. (in novel, film) → malo/a m/f
the villain of the piece is Malone (hum) → el malo de la historia es Malone

villain

[ˈvɪlən] n
(in novel, film, play)méchant m
He was cast as the villain → Il avait le rôle du méchant.
(= scoundrel) → scélérat m
(= criminal) → bandit m

villain

n
(= scoundrel)Schurke m, → Schurkin f; (inf: = criminal) → Verbrecher(in) m(f), → Ganove m (inf)
(in drama, novel) → Bösewicht m
(inf: = rascal) → Bengel m; he’s the villain of the pieceer ist der Übeltäter

villain

[ˈvɪlən] nmascalzone m (hum) (rascal) → briccone/a; (scoundrel) → canaglia; (in novel, film) → cattivo (fam) (criminal) → delinquente m

villain

(ˈvilən) noun
a person who is wicked or of very bad character. the villain of the play/story.
ˈvillainous adjective
ˈvillainyplural ˈvillainies noun
(an instance of) wickedness. His villainy was well known.

villain

وَغْد darebák skurk Bösewicht αχρείος villano roisto méchant negativac furfante 悪党 악한 schurk kjeltring łajdak vilão злодей skurk ตัวชั่วร้าย hain kẻ ác 恶棍
References in periodicals archive ?
But Jodorowsky's vision is even more cinematic, as he introduces a mad doctor who creates an emotionless, perfect "Showman Killer.
Even the pristine white snow bleeds bright scarlet in "Crimson Peak," the malformed love child of a richly atmospheric gothic romance and an overripe Italian giallo--delivered into this world by the mad doctor himself, horror maestro Guillermo del Toro, operating at his most stylistically unhinged.
I would normally be up in arms about this inconvenience but I am quite looking forward to this one as my cousin is a mad Doctor Who fan and is having a Timelord themed ceremony and reception.
Similarly outlandish is Lewis' contribution to the "mad scientist" sub-genre, The Mad Doctor of Market Street (1942), a film discussed with considerable flair by Lance Duerfahrd in a conceptually ambitious essay on cinematic "belief (98) that attempts to read the sub-genre as a metaphor for the B-movie industry itself.
The mad doctor enlists the Travelers to set a trap, hence the title "No Exit," which involves locking Damon and Enzo in a house together with only Enzo can cure Damon's hunger for blood.
When Captain Thorne Sherman (James Best, “The Dukes of Hazzard,” “The Killer Shrews”) is hired by a reality TV show crew to return to the island home of the deadly shrews after many years, he discovers that the Killer Shrews haven't just survived, they absolutely thrived under the care of a mad doctor (Bruce Davison, “X-Men,” “Willard”).
The second section examines a number of specific films, including Mad Doctor of Market Street, Bombs over Burma, and So Dark the Night.
Surviving the Angel of Death: The True Story of A Mengele Twin in Auschwitz" is a memoir from Eva Mozes Kor with Lisa Rojany Buccieri as Kor accounts her suffering through this time, and the experiments of mad doctor Josef Mengele, who had a particular fascination with twins, and often excluded them from other Holocaust victims for his own uses.
Wertham complained that the mad doctor cuts off one victim's legs, another's hands, and a third's hair, but what he didn't mention is how demurely these crimes are staged.
But it looks like nobody's too happy with the reshuffle except the faithful Mary Coughlan, surely the Igor to Cowen's Mad Doctor, all rolling eyes and lisping, "Yes, Marrr-ster", as she helps him stitch bits of this corpse of a government together to create yet another monster.
She is an actress, had among her most memorable moments playing a mad doctor called May Wright, who was married to businessman Rob Minter, who was having it off with a barmaid in Eastenders a couple of years ago.
ECCENTRIC Harry Carr was nicknamed the Mad Doctor as he tinkered with the old motors he loved.