Madeira


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Related to Madeira: Madeira cake

Ma·dei·ra 1

 (mə-dîr′ə, -dĕr′ə)
A river of northwest Brazil rising on the Bolivian border and flowing about 3,315 km (2,060 mi) generally northeast to the Amazon River near Manaus. It is the most important tributary of the Amazon.

Ma·dei·ra 2

 (mə-dîr′ə, -dĕr′ə)
n.
A fortified dessert wine, especially from the island of Madeira.

Madeira

(məˈdɪərə; Portuguese məˈðəirə)
n
1. (Placename) a group of volcanic islands in the N Atlantic, west of Morocco: since 1976 an autonomous region of Portugal; consists of the chief island, Madeira, Porto Santo, and the uninhabited Deserta and Selvagen Islands. Capital: Funchal. Pop: 245 012 (2001). Area: 797 sq km (311 sq miles)
2. (Placename) a river in W Brazil, flowing northeast to the Amazon below Manaus. Length: 3241 km (2013 miles)
3. (Brewing) a rich strong fortified white wine made on Madeira

Ma•dei•ra

(məˈdɪər ə, -ˈdɛər ə)

n.
1. a group of eight islands off the NW coast of Africa belonging to Portugal. 258,000; 308 sq. mi. (798 sq. km). Cap.: Funchal.
2. the chief island of this group. 286 sq. mi. (741 sq. km).
3. (often l.c.) a fortified amber-colored wine from Madeira.
4. a river in W Brazil flowing NE to the Amazon: chief tributary of the Amazon. 2100 mi. (3380 km) long.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Madeira - a Brazilian riverMadeira - a Brazilian river; tributary of the Amazon River
Brasil, Brazil, Federative Republic of Brazil - the largest Latin American country and the largest Portuguese speaking country in the world; located in the central and northeastern part of South America; world's leading coffee exporter
2.Madeira - an island in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Africa; the largest of the Madeira Islands
Madeira Islands, Madeiras - a group of volcanic islands in the Atlantic Ocean to the west of Morocco; the group forms an autonomous region of Portugal
3.Madeira - an amber dessert wine from the Madeira IslandsMadeira - an amber dessert wine from the Madeira Islands
fortified wine - wine to which alcohol (usually grape brandy) has been added
malmsey - sweet Madeira wine
Translations
Madeira
Madera

Madeira

[məˈdɪərə] NMadeira f; (= wine) → (vino m de) madeira m

Madeira

[məˈðəirə] n
(= island) → Madère f
(= wine) → madère mmade-to-measure [ˌmeɪdtəˈmɛʒər] adj (British) [suit, curtains] → fait(e) sur mesuremade-up [ˌmeɪdˈʌp] adj
(= invented) [story, word, name] → inventé(e)
(= false) → faux(fausse)
(with cosmetics) [woman] → maquillé(e); [eyes, face] → maquillé(e)

Madeira

nMadeira nt; (= wine)Madeira m

Madeira

[məˈdɪərə] n (Geog) → Madera; (wine) → madera m
References in classic literature ?
The delicacies of the season, in short, and flavored by a brand of old Madeira which has been the pride of many seasons.
Another slice of cold meat, another draught of Madeira and water, will make you nearly on a par with the rest of us.
I am listening," said La Ramee, leaning back in his armchair and raising his glass of Madeira to his lips, and winking his eye that he might see the sun through the rich liquid that he was about to taste.
Our host, in due season, uncorked a bottle of Madeira, of such exquisite perfume and admirable flavor that he surely must have discovered it in an ancient bin, down deep beneath the deepest cellar, where some jolly old butler stored away the Governor's choicest wine, and forgot to reveal the secret on his death-bed.
roared the newly appointed sheriff; “is there not warmth enough in ‘Duke’s best Madeira to keep up the animal heat through this thaw?
Edmund said no more to either lady; but going quietly to another table, on which the supper-tray yet remained, brought a glass of Madeira to Fanny, and obliged her to drink the greater part.
You will take something, of course," said Miss Noemie, who was sipping a glass of madeira.
If you dined with the Lovell Mingotts you got canvas-back and terrapin and vintage wines; at Adeline Archer's you could talk about Alpine scenery and "The Marble Faun"; and luckily the Archer Madeira had gone round the Cape.
And there were other elements of good cheer: a log fire blazing heartily in the old dog-grate, casting a glow over the stone flags, a reassuring flicker into the darkest corner: cold viands of the very best: and the finest old Madeira that has ever passed my lips.
Captain Marryatt writes: "I do not know a spot on the globe which so much astonishes and delights upon first arrival as Madeira.
We can find these enchantments without visiting the Como Lake, or the Madeira Islands.
Sir Henry was sitting opposite to me in a Madeira chair, his arms leaning on the table.