madrigal

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mad·ri·gal

 (măd′rĭ-gəl)
n.
1.
a. A song for two or three unaccompanied voices, developed in Italy in the late 1200s and early 1300s.
b. A short poem, often about love, suitable for being set to music.
2.
a. A polyphonic song using a vernacular text and written for four to six voices, developed in Italy in the 16th century and popular in England in the 1500s and early 1600s.
b. A part song.

[Italian madrigale, probably from dialectal madregal, simple, from Late Latin mātrīcālis, invented, original, from Latin, of the womb, from mātrīx, mātrīc-, womb, from māter, mātr-, mother; see mater.]

mad′ri·gal·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

madrigal

(ˈmædrɪɡəl)
n
1. (Classical Music) music a type of 16th- or 17th-century part song for unaccompanied voices with an amatory or pastoral text. Compare glee2
2. (Classical Music) a 14th-century Italian song, related to a pastoral stanzaic verse form
[C16: from Italian, from Medieval Latin mātricāle primitive, apparently from Latin mātrīcālis of the womb, from matrīx womb]
ˈmadrigalˌesque adj
madrigalian adj
ˈmadrigalist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mad•ri•gal

(ˈmæd rɪ gəl)

n.
1. an unaccompanied polyphonic secular vocal composition, esp. of the 16th and 17th centuries.
2. part song; glee.
3. a short lyric poem of medieval times.
[1580–90; < Italian madrigale < Medieval Latin mātricāle something simple]
mad′ri•gal•ist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

madrigal

1. a part song for several voices making much use of contrapuntal imitation.
2. a lyric poem suitable for setting to music, usually with love as a theme. — madrigalist, n.
See also: Songs and Singing
a lyric poem suitable for setting to music, usually with love as a theme. — madrigalist, n.
See also: Verse
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

madrigal

An unaccompanied song for several voices.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.madrigal - an unaccompanied partsong for 2 or 3 voicesmadrigal - an unaccompanied partsong for 2 or 3 voices; follows a strict poetic form
partsong - a song with two or more voice parts
Verb1.madrigal - sing madrigalsmadrigal - sing madrigals; "The group was madrigaling beautifully"
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
sing - deliver by singing; "Sing Christmas carols"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
قَصيدَه غَزَلِيَّه
madrigal
madrigal
madrigál
madrígal
madrigalas
madrigāls
madrigal
çalgısız söylenen şarkımadrigal

madrigal

[ˈmædrɪgəl] Nmadrigal m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

madrigal

nMadrigal nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

madrigal

[ˈmædrɪgl] nmadrigale m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

madrigal

(ˈmӕdrigəl) noun
a type of song for several voices singing unaccompanied in harmony.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
"Sleep thou, Sancho," returned Don Quixote, "for thou wast born to sleep as I was born to watch; and during the time it now wants of dawn I will give a loose rein to my thoughts, and seek a vent for them in a little madrigal which, unknown to thee, I composed in my head last night."
"What is the meaning of that speech, which is turned so like a French madrigal, duke?
*Faith Allendorf: Band, Jazz Band, Chorus, Madrigals, Musical, Quad-State Choral, and All-District Choral
He noted that choral singing has gained much popularity thanks to the efforts of the Madrigals and major choirs.
Tillman Merritt's edition of Andrea's complete madrigal output (Andrea Gabrieli, Complete Madrigals, Recent Researches in the Music of the Renaissance, 41-52 [Madison, WI: A-R Editions, 1981-84]) filled a significant gap in the availability of modern editions, while making it even more apparent that similar treatment was needed for the instrumental and sacred vocal works.
As bees make madrigals of minor keys and flickering votives of the
AFRICAN folk songs, gospel, jazz and Renaissance madrigals will be on the hymn sheet when a Black Country acapella choir performs.
The romantic madrigals people once entertained each other with in 16th century Italy have a curiously dark approach to love, says Diane Retallack, director of the Eugene Vocal Arts Ensemble.
`First' books of madrigals, like first symphonies, are always interesting, especially if their composers went on to become a Monteverdi or a Frescobaldi.
I Don't Want to Love isn't a bundle of laughs either, but Morris has only taken his lead from the set of Monteverdi madrigals at the heart of this Edinburgh Festival commission.
The madrigals of Adrian Willaert have long created difficulties for scholars and teachers.