maenad

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mae·nad

 (mē′năd′)
n.
1. Greek Mythology A woman member of the orgiastic cult of Dionysus.
2. A frenzied woman.

[Latin Maenas, Maenad-, from Greek mainas, raving, madwoman, Maenad, from mainesthai, to be mad; see men- in Indo-European roots.]

maenad

(ˈmiːnæd) or

menad

n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth a woman participant in the orgiastic rites of Dionysus; bacchante
2. a frenzied woman
[C16: from Latin Maenas, from Greek mainas madwoman]
maeˈnadic adj
maeˈnadically adv
ˈmaenadism n

mae•nad

(ˈmi næd)

n.
2. a frenzied or raging woman.
[1570–80; < Latin Maenad- (s. of Maenas) < Greek Mainás a bacchante, literally, madwoman]
mae•nad′ic, adj.
mae′nad•ism, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.maenad - an unnaturally frenzied or distraught woman
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"
2.maenad - (Greek mythology) a woman participant in the orgiastic rites of Dionysusmaenad - (Greek mythology) a woman participant in the orgiastic rites of Dionysus
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"
References in periodicals archive ?
If Pentheus experiences anagnorisis, that moment of recognition of the truth revealed to the protagonist in tragedy, his must be sudden, panicked, and brief, in the moment when his mother and her sister maenades tear him, literally, to pieces.
mora tarda mente cedat; simul ite, sequimini Phrygia ad domum Cybelles, Phrygia ad nemora deae, 20 ubi cymbalum sonat vox, ubi tympana reboant, tibicen ubi canit Phryx curvo grave calamo, ubi capita Maenades vi iaciunt ederigerae, ubi sacra sancta acutis ululatibus agitant, ubi suevit illa divae volitare vaga cohors: 25 quo nos decet citatis celerare tripudiis.
31) The remainder of Attis's frenzied speech effectively manipulates the kinship between the rites of Bacchus and those of Magna Mater so as to associate maenadism, a primarily female activity, with Attis: ubi capita Maenades vi iaciunt hederigerae, / ubi sacra sancta acutis ululatibus agitant ("where the ivy-crowned Maenads toss their heads violently, / where they shake the holy emblems with shrill yells," 63.