homer

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Ho·mer

 (hō′mər) fl. c. 750 bc.
Greek epic poet. Two of the greatest works in Western literature, the Iliad and the Odyssey, are attributed to him.

hom·er 1

 (hō′mər)
n.
1. Baseball A home run.
2. A homing pigeon.
intr.v. ho·mer·ed, ho·mer·ing, ho·mers Baseball
To hit a home run: homered in the fifth inning.

ho·mer 2

 (hō′mər)
n.
A unit of capacity used by the ancient Hebrews, equal to 10 ephahs (about 10 bushels) or 10 baths (about 100 gallons). Also called kor.

[Hebrew ḥōmer, heap, homer; see ḥmr in Semitic roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

homer

(ˈhəʊmə)
n
1. (Animals) another word for homing pigeon
2. (Baseball) US and Canadian an informal word for home run

Homer

(ˈhəʊmə)
n
1. (Biography) c. 800 bc, Greek poet to whom are attributed the Iliad and the Odyssey. Almost nothing is known of him, but it is thought that he was born on the island of Chios and was blind
2. (Biography) Winslow. 1836–1910, US painter, noted for his seascapes and scenes of working life
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

hom•er1

(ˈhoʊ mər)

n., v. -ered, -er•ing. n. v.i.
3. to hit a home run.
[1865–70; home + -er1]

ho•mer2

(ˈhoʊ mər)

n.
an ancient Hebrew unit of capacity equal to ten baths in liquid measure or ten ephahs in dry measure. Also called kor.
[1525–35; < Hebrew ḥōmer literally, heap]

Ho•mer

(ˈhoʊ mər)

n.
1. 9th-century B.C. Greek epic poet: reputed author of the Iliad and Odyssey.
2. Winslow, 1836–1910, U.S. artist.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.homer - a base hit on which the batter scores a runhomer - a base hit on which the batter scores a run
base hit, safety - (baseball) the successful act of striking a baseball in such a way that the batter reaches base safely
solo blast, solo homer - a home run with no runners on base
2.Homer - ancient Greek epic poet who is believed to have written the Iliad and the Odyssey (circa 850 BC)
3.homer - an ancient Hebrew unit of capacity equal to 10 baths or 10 ephahs
bath - an ancient Hebrew liquid measure equal to about 10 gallons
epha, ephah - an ancient Hebrew unit of dry measure equal to about a bushel
4.Homer - United States painter best known for his seascapes (1836-1910)
5.homer - pigeon trained to return homehomer - pigeon trained to return home  
domestic pigeon - domesticated pigeon raised for sport or food
carrier pigeon - a homing pigeon used to carry messages
Verb1.homer - hit a home run
rack up, score, tally, hit - gain points in a game; "The home team scored many times"; "He hit a home run"; "He hit .300 in the past season"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Homer
Homeros

Homer

[ˈhəʊməʳ] NHomero

homer

[ˈhəʊməʳ] N (Brit) → trabajo m fuera de hora, chollo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Homer

nHomer m

homer

n
(= homing pigeon)Brieftaube f
(Brit inf: = job) → Nebenjob m (inf); to do something as a homeretw privat or nebenher machen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Homer

[ˈhəʊməʳ] nOmero
even Homer nods → errare humanum est
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Yet not the more Cease I to wander where the Muses haunt Cleer Spring, or shadie Grove, or Sunnie Hill, Smit with the love of sacred song; but chief Thee SION and the flowrie Brooks beneath That wash thy hallowd feet, and warbling flow, Nightly I visit: nor somtimes forget Those other two equal'd with me in Fate, So were I equal'd with them in renown, Blind THAMYRIS and blind MAEONIDES, And TIRESIAS and PHINEUS Prophets old.
Blind Thamyris, and blind Maeonides, Pursue the triumph and partake the gale!
In his explication of the Invocations of Paradise Lost Noam Flinker has shown how the "mythic allusions to the four blind ancients [Thamyris, Maeonides, Tiresias and Phineus: 3.35-36] help to establish a psychological struggle within the narrator that is best understood as the wise shaping of the unconscious or Fansie by his artistic 'reason' which recognizes the importance of sexuality and wishes to govern or mold this 'Wild work' (5.112) into an acceptable artistic experience" (96).