magazine

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mag·a·zine

 (măg′ə-zēn′, măg′ə-zēn′)
n.
1. A periodical containing a collection of articles, stories, pictures, or other features.
2. A television program that presents a variety of topics, usually on current events, in a format that often includes interviews and commentary.
3.
a. A place where goods are stored, especially a building in a fort or a storeroom on a warship where ammunition is kept.
b. The contents of a storehouse, especially a stock of ammunition.
4.
a. A compartment in some types of firearms, often a small detachable box, in which cartridges are held to be fed into the firing chamber.
b. A compartment in a camera in which rolls or cartridges of film are held for feeding through the exposure mechanism.
c. Any of various compartments attached to machines, used for storing or supplying necessary material.
adj.
Of or relating to periodicals: a magazine story.

[French magasin, storehouse, from Old French magazin (possibly via Old Italian magazzino), from Arabic maḫāzin, pl. of maḫzan, from ḫazana, to store, from Aramaic ḥassen, to possess, hoard, derived stem of ḥəsan, to be strong; see ḫsn in Semitic roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

magazine

(ˌmæɡəˈziːn)
n
1. (Journalism & Publishing) a periodical paperback publication containing articles, fiction, photographs, etc
2. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a metal box or drum holding several cartridges used in some kinds of automatic firearms; it is removed and replaced when empty
3. (Military) a building or compartment for storing weapons, explosives, military provisions, etc
4. (Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a stock of ammunition
5. (Mechanical Engineering) a device for continuously recharging a handling system, stove, or boiler with solid fuel
6. (Photography) photog another name for cartridge5
7. a rack for automatically feeding a number of slides through a projector
8. (Broadcasting) a TV or radio programme made up of a series of short nonfiction items
[C16: via French magasin from Italian magazzino, from Arabic makhāzin, plural of makhzan storehouse, from khazana to store away]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mag•a•zine

(ˌmæg əˈzin, ˈmæg əˌzin)

n.
1. a periodical publication, usu. paperbound, that typically contains essays, stories, poems, and often illustrations.
2. a television program that combines interviews, commentary, and entertainment.
3. a room for keeping gunpowder and other explosives.
4. a military depot for arms or provisions.
6. a receptacle on a gun for holding cartridges.
[1575–85; < French magasin < Italian magazzino storehouse < Arabic makhāzin, pl. of makhzan storehouse; in E figuratively, as “storehouse of information,” used in book and periodical titles]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

magazine

- Considered a "storehouse" for articles; the word comes from Arabic makhzan, "storehouse," and was first used in book titles presenting a "store" of information about specific topics.
See also related terms for storehouse.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Magazine

 a place where goods are stored; a warehouse or depot, 1583; a building in which arms, ammunition, or provision for an army are kept for use in time of war, 1596; in modern times it is a periodical publication which contains a wide range of articles, pictures, and advertisements, aimed at a class, age group, or other category of readers interested in a specific subject or place.
Examples: magazine of arms, 1810; of bliss, 1599; of chaises, 1786; of coal, 1771; of darts and arrow, 1781; of flesh, milk, butter, and cheese, 1719; of knowledge, 1836; of law, 1760; of learning, 1610; of malice, 1750; of nourishment, 1615; of petitions, 1817; of powder (gunpowder), 1613; of power, 1836; of provisions, 1589; of sin, 1709; of topics, 1795; of good words, 1638; cloudy magazine of storms, 1644.
Dictionary of Collective Nouns and Group Terms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

magazine

shop
1. 'magazine'

A magazine is a collection of articles, photographs, and advertisements published every week or every month.

Her face was on the cover of every magazine.
Tanya read a magazine while she waited.
2. 'shop'

Don't use 'magazine' to refer to a building or part of a building where things are sold. The word you use is shop or store.

There is a row of shops on the High Street.
Collins COBUILD English Usage © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 2004, 2011, 2012
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.magazine - a periodic publication containing pictures and stories and articles of interest to those who purchase it or subscribe to itmagazine - a periodic publication containing pictures and stories and articles of interest to those who purchase it or subscribe to it; "it takes several years before a magazine starts to break even or make money"
center spread, centre spread - the spread at the center of a magazine
public press, press - the print media responsible for gathering and publishing news in the form of newspapers or magazines
feature article, feature - a special or prominent article in a newspaper or magazine; "they ran a feature on retirement planning"
magazine article - an article published in a magazine
publication - a copy of a printed work offered for distribution
colour supplement - (British) a magazine that is printed in color and circulated with a newspaper (especially on weekends)
comic book - a magazine devoted to comic strips
news magazine - a magazine devoted to reports of current events; usually published weekly
pulp magazine, pulp - an inexpensive magazine printed on poor quality paper
glossy, slick magazine, slick - a magazine printed on good quality paper
trade magazine - a magazine published for and read by members of a particular trade group
2.magazine - product consisting of a paperback periodic publication as a physical objectmagazine - product consisting of a paperback periodic publication as a physical object; "tripped over a pile of magazines"
product, production - an artifact that has been created by someone or some process; "they improve their product every year"; "they export most of their agricultural production"
3.magazine - a business firm that publishes magazinesmagazine - a business firm that publishes magazines; "he works for a magazine"
publisher, publishing company, publishing firm, publishing house - a firm in the publishing business
4.magazine - a light-tight supply chamber holding the film and supplying it for exposure as requiredmagazine - a light-tight supply chamber holding the film and supplying it for exposure as required
camera, photographic camera - equipment for taking photographs (usually consisting of a lightproof box with a lens at one end and light-sensitive film at the other)
supply chamber - a mechanical device for holding something and supplying it as needed
5.magazine - a storehouse (as a compartment on a warship) where weapons and ammunition are storedmagazine - a storehouse (as a compartment on a warship) where weapons and ammunition are stored
storehouse, depot, entrepot, storage, store - a depository for goods; "storehouses were built close to the docks"
6.magazine - a metal frame or container holding cartridgesmagazine - a metal frame or container holding cartridges; can be inserted into an automatic gun
gun - a weapon that discharges a missile at high velocity (especially from a metal tube or barrel)
pincurl clip - a variety of clip for holding pin curls
supply chamber - a mechanical device for holding something and supplying it as needed
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

magazine

noun
1. journal, paper, publication, supplement, rag (informal), issue, glossy (informal), pamphlet, periodical, fanzine (informal) Her face is on the cover of a dozen or more magazines.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

magazine

noun
A place where something is deposited for safekeeping:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
خَزّان البُنْدُقِيَّهذَخِيرَةٌ حَرْبِيَّةمَجَلَّةٌمَجَلَّهمَخْزَن للذَّخيرَه
časopiszásobníkčasopiseckýprachárna
magasintidsskriftsprængstoflagerbladblad-
magasin
aikakauslehtilipasmakasiinipatruunalipas
časopisspremnik
magazintölténytártárfolyóiratlõszerraktár
skotfærageymslaskothylki, magasíntímarit
弾薬雑誌
잡지탄창
dėtuvėmagazinasšaudmenų sandėlissprogmenųžurnalas
žurnālsmagazīnas kārba, aptverenoliktava
revistă
časopiseckýpracháreňzásobník
revija
magasintidskrift
jarida
ที่ใส่กระสุนนิตยสาร
ổ đạntạp chí

magazine

[ˌmægəˈziːn] N
1. (= journal) → revista f
2. (TV, Rad) (also magazine programme) → magazine m, programa m magazine
3. (in rifle) → recámara f; (in slide projector, round) → carrusel m; (elongated) → carro m, bandeja f
4. (Mil) (= store) → almacén m; (for powder) → polvorín m (Naut) → santabárbara f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

magazine

[ˌmægəˈziːn]
n
(= publication) → magazine m, revue f
(= programme) → magazine m
[firearm] → magasin m
(= store) → dépôt m, arsenal m
modif [advert, article, cover, editor] → de magazine; [interview] → dans un magazinemagazine rack nporte-revues m inv
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

magazine

n
(= journal)Zeitschrift f, → Magazin nt
(in gun) → Magazin nt
(Mil: = store) → Magazin nt (Hist), → Depot nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

magazine

[ˌmægəˈziːn] n
a. (Press) → rivista
b. (of firearm) → caricatore m (Mil) (store) → deposito, magazzino
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

magazine

(mӕgəˈziːn) , ((American) ˈmӕgəzi:n) noun
1. (abbreviation mag (mӕg) ) a publication issued regularly containing articles, stories etc by various writers. women's magazines; (also adjective) a magazine article.
2. a compartment in or on a gun that holds cartridges.
3. a storeroom for ammunition, explosives etc.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

magazine

ذَخِيرَةٌ حَرْبِيَّة, مَجَلَّةٌ časopis, zásobník magasin Munitionslager, Zeitschrift γεμιστήρας, περιοδικό cargador, revista aikakauslehti, patruunalipas magasin, magazine časopis, spremnik caricatore, rivista 弾薬, 雑誌 잡지, 탄창 magazijn, tijdschrift magasin, tidsskrift magazyn, magazynek câmara, revista журнал, магазин magasin, tidskrift ที่ใส่กระสุน, นิตยสาร dergi, Şarjör ổ đạn, tạp chí 弹药, 杂志
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
During the fifteen years of his literary life Poe was connected with various newspapers and magazines in Richmond, Philadelphia and New York.
Poe was connected at various times and in various capacities with the "Southern Literary Messenger" in Richmond, Va.; "Graham's Magazine" and the "Gentleman's Magazine" in Philadelphia.; the "Evening Mirror," the "Broadway journal," and "Godey's Lady's Book" in New York.
From the women's pages of the Sunday supplements, and from the women's magazines in the free reading room two blocks away, she gleaned many idess for the preservation of her looks.
She even ventured a rag carpet, which, the women's magazines informed her, had newly returned into fashion.
There were books and magazines piled up in the window of a stall a few paces down the street.
He toiled on till dark, when he went out to the reading-room and explored magazines and weeklies until the place closed at ten o'clock.
One day Anne took to the Post Office a long, bulky envelope, addressed, with the delightful confidence of youth and inexperience, to the very biggest of the "big" magazines. Diana was as excited over it as Anne herself.
It was in one of the magazines for December, 1899, that an article appeared which afforded our minds a brief respite from the then consuming excitement of the war in South Africa.
Tom Swift, who had been slowly looking through the pages of a magazine, in the contents of which he seemed to be deeply interested, turned the final folio, ruffled the sheets back again to look at a certain map and drawing, and then, slapping the book down on a table before him, with a noise not unlike that of a shot, exclaimed:
The period is that which follows on my connection with Blackwood's Magazine. I had just finished writing "The End of the Tether" and was casting about for some subject which could be developed in a shorter form than the tales in the volume of "Youth" when the instance of a steamship full of returning coolies from Singapore to some port in northern China occurred to my recollection.
"Then," said Felix, "I move that the name be The King Monthly Magazine."
It was first fixed in print in the "Cornhill Magazine", being my first appearance in a serial of any kind; and I have lived long enough to see it guyed most agreeably by Mr.