Magdalena Bay


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Magdalena Bay

n
(Placename) an inlet of the Pacific on the coast of NW Mexico, in Lower California
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"The commitment of the present state administration is the human, social and economic development of the inhabitants of all the communities that make up Baja California Sur and this development can not be conceived, without first ensuring the most indispensable thing to live like water is" , Governor Carlos Mendoza Davis said when he delivered the Magdalena Bay desalination plant in the municipality of Comond.
A grey whale calf surfaces near Magdalena Bay, Baja California, Mexico.
The Mag Bay 33 was recently unveiled by Mag Bay Yachts (named for Magdalena Bay, a beautiful cove halfway down the Baja California peninsula).
Management priorities for Magdalena Bay, Baja California, Mexico.
The geoduck Panopea globosa is found on the Pacific coast of Baja California south of Bahia Magdalena Bay and throughout the Gulf of California, and sustains a vibrant and growing fishery.
Surrounded by mountains and pristine scenery, Magdalena Bay is the place to see seals and even polar bears and whales.
Surrounded by mountains and pristine scenery, Magdalena Bay is the place to see seals and - if you're really lucky - you might even spot polar bears and whales.
Both of the records previously belonged to Mike Livingston, who caught a 183.7kg (405-pound) Yellowfin on November 30, 2010 while fishing Magdalena Bay, Mexico.
There were fresh polar bear tracks in the snow so our armed rangers advised us not to stray too far when we arrived from Quest for Adventure at Magdalena Bay in the Arctic.
The estimate of a PLD for spotted sand bass of 22 d ranging from 17-27 d was based on earlier work on fishes collected in Magdalena Bay, Baja California Sur, Mexico.
For example, Magdalena Bay's integral role in the Pacific maritime fur trade with China (circa 1790s-1850) is treated, as are later visitations to that bay by the warships and commercial vessels of Japan, Germany, Britain, and the United States in the twentieth century.
He probably also consulted The Polynesian, a Honolulu-based newspaper that provided sometimes-detailed reports on whales taken per vessel, referring to the "California Coast" and at least occasionally to specific locations such as Turtle Bay or Magdalena Bay (Fig.