olivine

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Related to Magnesium iron silicate: Calcium silicate, Magnesium iron silicate hydroxide, Magnesium Aluminum Silicate

ol·i·vine

 (ŏl′ə-vēn′)
n.
A mineral silicate of iron and magnesium, principally (Mg, Fe)2SiO4, found in igneous and metamorphic rocks and used as a structural material in refractories and in cements. Also called chrysolite.

[olive (from its color) + -ine.]

ol′i·vin′ic (-vĭn′ĭk), ol′i·vi·nit′ic (-və-nĭt′ĭk) adj.

olivine

(ˈɒlɪˌviːn; ˌɒlɪˈviːn)
n
1. (Minerals) an olive-green mineral of the olivine group, found in igneous and metamorphic rocks. The clear-green variety (peridot) is used as a gemstone. Composition: magnesium iron silicate. Formula: (MgFe)2SiO4. Crystal structure: orthorhombic. Also called: chrysolite
2. (Minerals) any mineral in the group having the general formula (Mg,Fe,Mn,Ca)2SiO4
[C18: from German, named after its colour]

ol•i•vine

(ˈɒl əˌvin, ˌɒl əˈvin)

n.
any of a group of magnesium iron silicates, (Mg,Fe)2SiO4, occurring in olive-green to gray-green masses as an important constituent of basic igneous rocks. Also called chrysolite.
[1785–95; < German Olivin=Olive olive + -in -ine2]

ol·i·vine

(ŏl′ə-vēn′)
An olive-green to brownish-green mineral consisting primarily of iron, magnesium, and silica. Olivine is a common mineral in the igneous rocks, such as basalt and gabbro, that make up most of the Earth's crust beneath the oceans.

olivine

A dark green silicate.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.olivine - a mineral consisting of magnesium iron silicate; a source of magnesium
atomic number 12, magnesium, Mg - a light silver-white ductile bivalent metallic element; in pure form it burns with brilliant white flame; occurs naturally only in combination (as in magnesite and dolomite and carnallite and spinel and olivine)
mineral - solid homogeneous inorganic substances occurring in nature having a definite chemical composition
chrysolite - a brown or yellow-green olivine found in igneous and metamorphic rocks and used as a gemstone
References in periodicals archive ?
4), Thomas Sumner explained that the form of magnesium iron silicate that makes up more than a third of the planet's volume is now officially called bridgmanite.
And in doing so, a team of scientists led by Oliver Tschauner, a mineralogist at the University of Las Vegas, clarified the definition of the Earth's most abundant mineral -- a high-density form of magnesium iron silicate, now called Bridgmanite -- and defined estimated constraint ranges for its formation.
The mineral is made up of magnesium iron silicate of high density.