magnet therapy

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magnet therapy

n.
An alternative medical therapy in which the placement of magnets or magnetic devices on the skin is thought to prevent or treat symptoms of disease, especially pain.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fact.MR has announced the addition of the "Magnetic Therapy Devices Market Forecast, Trend Analysis & Competition Tracking - Global Market Insights 2018 to 2028"report to their offering.
It was then that a dear friend of mine introduced me to magnetic therapy.
Tenders are invited for magnetic therapy service in the city of barcelona and its geographic influence
These little magnets, which cost between [pounds sterling]35 and [pounds sterling]50, claim their magnetic therapy soothes the symptoms of menopause for 71 per cent of women by re-balancing their autonomic nervous system (ANS).
Effect of static magnetic therapy on recovery from delayed onset muscle soreness.
The Korean beauty specialists introduced an entire range of innovative products that utilize gold leaf, magnetic therapy and oxygen therapy in innovative treatments aimed to revitalize and rejuvenate skin tone and condition.
Thought to increase circulation and relieve arthritis pain, the Copper Magnetic Therapy Bracelet is a stylish way to wear relief.
Cosmetic brushes have seen a number of advances in fibers, but now HCT Group's Magnetic Therapy Brushes for makeup and skin care application offer a benefit even beyond application proficiency.
Worse, is when we hear of those opportunists who have enthusiastically climbed on the cancer band wagon trumpeting that they can 'cure cancer' via everything from oxygen, metabolic and magnetic therapy, to eating shark cartilage.
Improvement in weight bearing was observed and significant decrease in lameness was found in ultrasound therapy as compared to magnetic therapy on 9th, 12th and 19th days ([x.sup.2] = 1, 0.22 and 1 respectively; p < 0.05).
Ginkgo biloba, reflexology, and magnetic therapy all had some proven level of efficacy, while bee venom, low-fat diet with omega3 supplementation, and lofepramine plus L-phenylalanine with B12 were all found ineffective, the subcommittee said (Neurology 2014;82:1083-92).