magnesia

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mag·ne·sia

 (măg-nē′zhə)
[Short for New Latin magnēsia alba, literally, white magnesia : Medieval Latin magnēsia, mineral ingredient in the philosopher's stone (from Greek magnēsiā, a kind of ore, talc or a talclike substance, after Magnēsiē, a region of Thessaly where it was found, from Magnēs, an inhabitant of Thessalian Magnesia) + Latin alba, feminine of albus, white.]

mag·ne′sian adj.

magnesia

(mæɡˈniːʃə)
n
(Elements & Compounds) another name for magnesium oxide
[C14: via Medieval Latin from Greek Magnēsia, of Magnēs ancient mineral-rich region]
magˈnesian, magnesic, magˈnesial adj

mag•ne•sia

(mægˈni ʒə, -ʃə)

n.
a white tasteless substance, magnesium oxide, MgO, used in medicine as an antacid and laxative. Compare milk of magnesia.
[< New Latin]
mag•ne′sian, adj.

mag·ne·sia

(măg-nē′zhə)
A white powder, MgO, used in heat-resistant materials because of its very high melting point. It is also used in medicine as an antacid or laxative.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.magnesia - a white solid mineral that occurs naturally as periclasemagnesia - a white solid mineral that occurs naturally as periclase; a source of magnesium
atomic number 12, magnesium, Mg - a light silver-white ductile bivalent metallic element; in pure form it burns with brilliant white flame; occurs naturally only in combination (as in magnesite and dolomite and carnallite and spinel and olivine)
mineral - solid homogeneous inorganic substances occurring in nature having a definite chemical composition
Translations

magnesia

[mægˈniːʃə] Nmagnesia f

magnesia

nMagnesia f

magnesia

[mægˈniːʃə] nmagnesia

mag·ne·si·a

n. magnesia, óxido de magnesio;
milk of ___leche de ___.
References in periodicals archive ?
In Greece it has been recorded from several localities of southern and central mainland and some islands, as far north as Kerkira island and Magnisia.
We thank David Nestel (IPP-The Volcani Center, Beit-Dagan, Israel), Nikos Papadopoulos (University of Thessaly, Magnisia, Greece), and Steve Ferkovich (CMAVE, USDA-ARS, Gainesville-FL, USA) for critical reviews of an earlier version of this manuscript.
The official raw statistical data from NSSG suggest that there are relatively low values of informal housing in Attiki and Thessaloniki (the urban prefectures of the country) and much higher values in the prefectures of Evia, Magnisia, Imathia, Pieria and Chalkidiki.