Mahometanism


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Related to Mahometanism: Mahomedan, inveigh, seraglio

Ma`hom´et`an`ism


prop. n.1.See Mohammedanism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moving from village to village, "the Luther of Mahometanism," as Lady Blunt described him, denounced such folk practices as worshiping at saints' graves and praying at sacred trees.
Perhaps it is a partial development of the persecuting spirit of Mahometanism & it may yet remain to be seen whether we shall be allowed by these haughty masters of the Island to be unmolested for the salvation of these poor Dyaks" (Thomson, in Youngblood and Thomson 1842, and Thomson 1843a: 151).
The rapid progress of Mahometanism in these [African] countries alarms all the friends of Africa, all those who take an interest in these unfortunate people, and follow the march of events.
1891) ("The real object of the [First] [A]mendment was, not to countenance, much less to advance Mahometanism, or Judaism, or infidelity, by prostrating Christianity; but to exclude all rivalry among Christian sects, and to prevent any national ecclesiastical establishment, which should give to an hierarchy the exclusive patronage of the national government.
Consequently, Bibliander attempts to ward off this accusation by portraying Mahometanism and Protestantism as distinct, but the result was a deeply ambivalent portrayal of Mahomet.
In "The Prophet Vindicated: A Restoration Treatise on Islam and Muhammad," Bosworth recounts the life of Henry Stubbe (1632-76) and the composition and fate of his book, An Account of the Rise and Progress of Mahometanism, with the Life of Mahomet and a Vindication of Him and His Religion from the Calumnies of the Christians.
Nabil Matar, Henry Stubbe's The Rise and Progress of Mahometanism. New York: Columbia University Press, 2014.
"It is a singular paradox, that Christianity, whose doctrines inculcate unbounded charity, should have been made so often an engine of persecution; while Mahometanism, whose principles are those of avowed intolerance, should have exhibited, at least till later times, a truly philosophical spirit of toleration." Prescott may be getting carried away here; but even this vehement outburst is not without nuance, and he must be taken seriously.
Despite what Christians did, the Muslims abided by their religious instructions: "All the Attempts of the Christians to extirpate Mahometanism have not set them upon repealing this Toleration" which is enjoined in "several Passages in the Alcoran, the Substance whereof is, That every one, whether Christian, or Jew, who worships God, and leads a good Life, will certainly be blessed by God" (Complete History 267), Muslims gloried "that whereas all other Nations oppress their Subjects on account of religious Differences, they allow of an universal Toleration" (Complete History 170).
The real object of the [First A]mendment was not to countenance, much less to advance, Mahometanism, or Judaism, or infidelity, by prostrating Christianity; but to exclude all rivalry among Christian sects, and to prevent any national ecclesiastical establishment which should give to a hierarchy the exclusive patronage of the national government.
Otherwise, the Bible loses its privileged authority in relation to paganism, Judaism, and Mahometanism. (6) Radical hermetic thinkers, along with mystics and Quakers, not only refuted these two claims, but deployed a broad interpretation of the "Light" of Christian history in order to demonstrate that the church was responsible for having corrupted the pristine prophetic tradition.
Thousands, and thousands of souls here, to be converted from Paganism and Mahometanism to the religion of Jesus.