Mahound


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Mahound

(məˈhaʊnd; -ˈhuːnd)
n
(Biography) an archaic name for Mohammed
[C16: from Old French Mahun]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Mahound - the Arab prophet who, according to Islam, was the last messenger of Allah (570-632)Mahound - the Arab prophet who, according to Islam, was the last messenger of Allah (570-632)
References in classic literature ?
``I would soon have beat him into courtesy,'' observed Brian; ``I am accustomed to deal with such spirits: Our Turkish you shall soon be judge; and if the purity of her complexion, and the majestic, yet soft expression of a mild blue eye, do not chase from your memory the black-tressed girls of Palestine, ay, or the houris of old Mahound's paradise, I am an infidel, and no true son of the church.''
"They too are very hardy soldiers, the more so as for many hundred years they have had to fight hard against the cursed followers of the black Mahound, who have pressed upon them from the south, and still, as I understand, hold the fairer half of the country.
The medieval lack of historic sense gives to all the plays the setting of the authors' own times; Roman officers appear as feudal knights; and all the heathens (including the Jews) are Saracens, worshippers of 'Mahound' and 'Termagaunt'; while the good characters, however long they may really have lived before the Christian era, swear stoutly by St.
Oh Mohammed and Apollo, Mahound and Tervogant, The sharp blazons on this cloth-- If they, in fact, belong to me, I could be content in my heart That my family is a noble one; At least, it seems so to me, For I was wrapped up in these When I was found an abandoned babe.
The Satanic Verses has two parallel narratives: the magic realist world in which two Indian migrants, Saladin Chamcha and Gibreel Farishta, struggle for identity in multicultural London; and the dream sequences of Gibreel, occasioned by his crisis of religious faith, which provide a satirical revision of the Koran, in which the businessman Mahound establishes a new religion.
In the English drama, Jewish characters profess their faith to 'Machomet' throughout the Croxton Play of the Sacrament, while Herod swears by 'Mahound'--a pejorative corruption of the name of the Islamic prophet--in the York, Towneley, and Digby plays.
"His novel The Satanic Verses provoked riots in India, Pakistan, and South Africa, and was judged by senior religious figures in Iran to have blasphemed the Prophet Muhammad (called by the offensive name 'Mahound' in the novel), founder of the Muslim faith" (8th 2853).
Why make ye Mahound this present And so disspice god omnipotent?
prophet Mohammed as 'Mahound' given by Salman Rushdie in his
Iraq has dealt with all sorts of problems from Iran, but as the next Iranian general elections come closer, Prime Minister Mahound Ahmadinejad may well want to show that he can influence events in Iraq, and he may get the pro-Iranian religious leaders or militias to show their strength.
(3) This transitory, fluid space becomes miraculous in the novel: characters start to fly in the air, Mahound (Muhammad) receives divine revelation on top of Mount Cone (Mount Hira), Allaluia meets the ghosts of famous mountain climbers on Everest, and so on.
In a sense, Rushdie was playing the same game with reference to the Muslim world by representing the Prophet of Islam as Mahound with a view to voicing the doubts of Iqbal, Ghazali, Khayaam.