maieutics


Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

maieutics

(meɪˈjuːtɪks)
n
(Philosophy) (functioning as singular) philosophy the Socratic method of eliciting knowledge by a series of questions and answers

maieutics

the method used by Socrates in bringing forth knowledge through questions and insistence upon close and logical reasoning. — maieutic, adj.
See also: Knowledge
Translations
Mäeutik
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
He reads in bifurcated maieutics in the literature of the age of Goethe, the concept of natality as it originates for Arendt in the inscrutable and irrefragable nature of divine creation and culminates in the hope for the public realm and the concept of worldliness that refers not to material or biological immanence but to the frailty of human affairs.
But if Elrod were to limit himself to this method, he would become a pedagogue who works through images, a critic who employs maieutics rather than words.
Conveying theories of everyday life and of education and linking back to philosophical tradition, whilst using socratic maieutics as his focus, Lefebvre takes this to mean "to help everyday life to produce a present-absent abundance" (Lefebvre, 1972: 31).
It can give rise to a maieutics truth of the subject, an otherness that would come from the subject itself, which would still be a source of alteration" (Baudrillard & Guillaume 2008: 23).
After Scotland, Reading was a special place, a special experience in 1968: a sort of omphalos mundi, where joining Gigi Meneghello, Giulio Lepschy and Franco Marenco meant, I soon realised, joining a busy lab where Italian and English, and Italian literature and English literature, generated a literary, cultural, political maieutics so to speak, a give-and-take with constantly high expectations.
The teacher needs to be able to streamline the method to each student's individual vocal character and natural potential by means of a kind of Socratic maieutics.
Incidentally, an in-depth appraisal of Levinas would bring us to welcome two highly controversial positions: Cartesian dualism (for only a separate self can envision infinity as well as externality or otherness) as well as a reassessment of education as encounter with exteriority rather than maieutics.
8) He is too good a Kierkegaardian to embrace a redemption more contingent on the maieutics ("midwifery") of Socrates than on the metanoetics ("repentance") of Jesus.
Socrates, as an expert in maieutics, helped his disciples discover their ability to think.
Delany's technique of dialogue often rests on the principle of Greek maieutics.
It is in these pedagogic contexts that Socrates makes the strongest claims about his discursive practice, professing to a kind of technical knowledge he variously characterizes as knowledge of erotics, (68) the practice of the one true political art, (69) or his participation in the art of maieutics.
We sense it in such comments as Levinas's "Teaching is not reducible to maieutics [the Socratic method]; it comes from the exterior and brings me more than I can contain,"(38) and Norman O.