maieutics


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maieutics

(meɪˈjuːtɪks)
n
(Philosophy) (functioning as singular) philosophy the Socratic method of eliciting knowledge by a series of questions and answers
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

maieutics

the method used by Socrates in bringing forth knowledge through questions and insistence upon close and logical reasoning. — maieutic, adj.
See also: Knowledge
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
Mäeutik
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References in periodicals archive ?
Consequently, the recognition of existential truth as truth in existence occurs through "existential maieutics" and the Spirit.
reminds me of a Greek word maieutics, which means literally "the work of a midwife." The word has been used by great philosophers, particularly Plato, to refer to how we deliver to people knowledge that they actually already possess, but that they possess unconsciously.
He reads in bifurcated maieutics in the literature of the age of Goethe, the concept of natality as it originates for Arendt in the inscrutable and irrefragable nature of divine creation and culminates in the hope for the public realm and the concept of worldliness that refers not to material or biological immanence but to the frailty of human affairs.
It's what John Dominic Crossan has called "participatory pedagogy" (26)--a kind of teaching in which teacher and pupil collaborate--and it is closely related to what Socrates called "maieutics" or midwifery.
But if Elrod were to limit himself to this method, he would become a pedagogue who works through images, a critic who employs maieutics rather than words.
Conveying theories of everyday life and of education and linking back to philosophical tradition, whilst using socratic maieutics as his focus, Lefebvre takes this to mean "to help everyday life to produce a present-absent abundance" (Lefebvre, 1972: 31).
It can give rise to a maieutics truth of the subject, an otherness that would come from the subject itself, which would still be a source of alteration" (Baudrillard & Guillaume 2008: 23).
After Scotland, Reading was a special place, a special experience in 1968: a sort of omphalos mundi, where joining Gigi Meneghello, Giulio Lepschy and Franco Marenco meant, I soon realised, joining a busy lab where Italian and English, and Italian literature and English literature, generated a literary, cultural, political maieutics so to speak, a give-and-take with constantly high expectations.
The "story-teller" calls herself "the palace of memory." Completely detached from reality, "the palace of memory" relates Argalia's personal history, in trance and with the help of il Machia's sexual maieutics: "There was once a prince named Arcalia.