Maimonides


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Mai·mon·i·des

 (mī-mŏn′ĭ-dēz′), Moses Originally Moses ben Maimon. Known as "Rambam." 1135?-1204.
Spanish-born Egyptian physician, rabbi, and philosopher who codified the Talmud in the Mishneh Torah (1170-1180) and attempted to reconcile Aristotelian philosophy with Jewish theology in Guide for the Perplexed (1190).

Maimonides

(maɪˈmɒnɪˌdiːz)
n
(Biography) also called Rabbi Moses ben Maimon. 1135–1204, Jewish philosopher, physician, and jurist, born in Spain. He codified Jewish law in Mishneh Torah (1180)
Maiˌmoniˈdean adj, n

Mai•mon•i•des

(maɪˈmɒn ɪˌdiz)

n.
(Moses ben Maimon) ( “RaMBaM” ), 1135–1204, Jewish philosopher and jurist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Maimonides - Spanish philosopher considered the greatest Jewish scholar of the Middle Ages who codified Jewish law in the Talmud (1135-1204)Maimonides - Spanish philosopher considered the greatest Jewish scholar of the Middle Ages who codified Jewish law in the Talmud (1135-1204)
References in periodicals archive ?
Previously, Dr Feldman was the vice president for patient safety, vice president of perioperative services,vice chairman of the department of surgery at Maimonides Medical Center (Maimonides) in Brooklyn, New York as well as president of the Maimonides medical staff.
Maimonides On the Regimen of Health: A New Parallel Arabic-English Translation
She cited Yehuda Romano, a 14th-century Hebrew scholar from Italy, who translated Maimonides' use of the word "hararah" (a type of flatbread) in the Mishneh Torah with four simple Hebrew letters: peh, yud, tzadi and heh, or "pizza," arguably the very first time the word was ever used in any language.
Hochman Maimonides Torch of Justice Award for his lifetime of civic leadership, legal excellence, and service to the Jewish and greater community.
Maimonides' Guide of the Perplexed: A Philosophical Guide.
The philosophers Thomas drew upon were many, as one may expect: notably, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, Seneca, Boethius, Pseudo Dionysius, Augustine, Anselm, Avicenna, Averroes, and Maimonides; and this list is not complete.
Government regulators, insurance companies, and many physician leaders have lost sight of the Oath of Maimonides, which states, "May the love of my art actuate me at all times; may neither avarice nor miserliness ...
Maimonides and the Merchants: Jewish Law and Society in the Medieval Islamic World.
Kaplan (Professor of Rabbinics and Jewish Philosophy in the Department of Jewish Studies of McGill University in Montreal), "Maimonides: Between Philosophy and Halakhah" is the first and only comprehensive study of the philosophy of Maimonides by the noted 20th-century rabbinic scholar and thinker, Rabbi Joseph B.
Cohen, Mark R., Maimonides and the Merchants: Jewish Law and Society in the Medieval Islamic World (Jewish Culture and Contexts), Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2017; cloth; pp.
This is, primarily, a study of the manner wherein the medieval legist and philosopher Moses Maimonides (Rambam; 1138-1204) incorporated wide swaths of Islamic commercial law in his magisterial summa legis, the Mishneh Torah (and to a significant degree deviated from Talmudic and post-Talmudic norms that were prima facie his only source of reference).
The current paper focuses on the rigid halakhic attitude of Maimonides (12th century), a medieval Rabbi and physician, towards providing medical services to gentiles.