dwarf star

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dwarf star

n.
A star, such as the sun, having relatively low mass, small size, and average or below average luminosity.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dwarf star

n
(Celestial Objects) any luminosity class V star, such as the sun, lying in the main sequence of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. Also called: main-sequence star See also red dwarf, white dwarf
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dwarf′ star′


n.
a star with relatively small mass and low or average luminosity, as the sun.
[1910–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

dwarf star

A small star of low mass that gives off an average or below average amount of light. The sun is a dwarf star.
Did You Know? In the world of stars, even a dwarf is quite large. At 864,000 miles in diameter and more than 330,000 times the mass of Earth, our sun is still a dwarf star. But a dwarf star is indeed small compared with certain other kinds of stars, such as red giants. Dwarf stars come in several varieties. The type of star known as a white dwarf is in fact the remnant of a red giant that has burned nearly all its fuel. Because of the gravitational attraction of its atoms for each other, the star starts to collapse in on itself. After it contracts and blows its outer layers away, the red giant ends up as a white dwarf. A black dwarf is a burned-out white dwarf that no longer gives off detectable radiation. Astronomers also refer to brown dwarfs, which are not stars. A brown dwarf is bigger than Jupiter, the biggest planet in our solar system, but too small to carry on the sustained nuclear reactions that are needed to become a true star.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

dwarf star

nZwerg(stern) m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
It is an O-type subdwarf, a star larger than a white dwarf but smaller than a main-sequence star of the same temperature.
According to the study, J0815+4729 is a main-sequence star located in Galactic Halo, some 7,500 light years from the center of the Milky Way and about 32,600 light years away from the Earth.
Figure 1 shows that red giants are much more luminous than their main-sequence star counterparts for the same mass.
A much better name, which means the same thing, is "main-sequence star." If you plot stars on a graph of color versus luminosity, as shown at left, most stars fall along a slightly wavy diagonal line.
Where the accretor is always a white dwarf, the donor star can be either a (helium or hybrid) white dwarf, a low-mass helium star or an evolved main-sequence star. Although all three types of donor star have been predicted to exist, observations suggest that only helium-star donors may have been found so far.
It is a main-sequence star, about 25 light years from Earth.
This would make Beta Pictoris far too young to qualify as a main-sequence star, burning hydrogen at its core.
66) of an unseen stellar companion definitely piqued my curiosity, since I seemed to recall that there was already a suspected main-sequence star companion near the central star of this nebula.
The Sun, middling size and yellow-white-hot, is a more or less average main-sequence star. Stars spend most of their lives burning quietly on the "main sequence" of stellar evolution.
Over billions of years, enough of this material could accumulate in a main-sequence star to leave a core of strange matter when the star dies.
Tau Ceti is a yellow G-type main-sequence star, similar to our own sun, but a bit smaller and cooler.