major depressive episode

(redirected from Major depressive episodes)
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Noun1.major depressive episode - (psychiatry) a state of depression with all the classic symptoms (anhedonia and lethargy and sleep disturbance and despondency and morbid thoughts and feelings of worthlessness and sometimes attempted suicide) but with no known organic dysfunctionmajor depressive episode - (psychiatry) a state of depression with all the classic symptoms (anhedonia and lethargy and sleep disturbance and despondency and morbid thoughts and feelings of worthlessness and sometimes attempted suicide) but with no known organic dysfunction
psychiatry, psychological medicine, psychopathology - the branch of medicine dealing with the diagnosis and treatment of mental disorders
clinical depression, depressive disorder, depression - a state of depression and anhedonia so severe as to require clinical intervention
involutional depression - a major depressive episode associated with the climacteric
unipolar depression - a major depressive episode that occurs without the manic phase that occurs in the classic form of bipolar disorder
References in periodicals archive ?
Intra-Cellular Therapiesannounced top-line results from two Phase 3 clinical trials evaluating lumateperone as monotherapy in the treatment of major depressive episodes associated with Bipolar I or Bipolar II disorder.
In the stress-diathesis model for suicidal behavior, stress from major depressive episodes and life events contributes to the patient's perception of stress, which in turn contributes to that patient's response to stress.
Although perimenopausal women are more susceptible to the development of depressive symptoms and major depressive episodes (MDE), there is a lack of consensus regarding how to evaluate and treat depression in women during the menopausal transition and postmenopausal period.
Lithium's emerging role in the treatment of refractory major depressive episodes: augmentation of antidepressants.
During that period, 7.1% of mothers suffered from major depressive episodes.1 In Pakistan, extensive data on the prevalence of perinatal depression is not available.
Frequent marijuana use, in both youth (aged 12-17 years) and young adults (aged 18-25 years), appears to be associated with opioid use, heavy alcohol use, and major depressive episodes.
If no items from criterion C are present, six of the following nine criteria are needed: 1) hyperthymic personality (at baseline, nondepressed state); 2) recurrent major depressive episode (>3); 3) brief major depressive episodes (on average, <3 months); 4) atypical depressive features (increased sleep or appetite); 5) psychotic major depressive episode; 6) early age at onset of major depressive episode (before age 25); 7) postpartum depression; 8) antidepressant tolerance ("wearoff," acute but not prophylactic response); 9) lack of response to >3 antidepressant treatment trials (Ghaemi, Hsu et al.
Depression, by its clinical nature, is prone to recur with moderate to severe major depressive episodes often needing hospitalization for treatment, stabilization and risk management (2-3).
There was significant increase in the national annual prevalence of major depressive episodes among adolescents age 12 to 17, which rose from 8.2% in 2011 to 12.5% in 2015.
An estimated 15.7 million Americans had major depressive episodes and 9.3 million seriously considered suicide.
The sole oral health indicator, persons who visited the dentist in the past year, joins suicide and major depressive episodes in adolescents in having gotten worse since baseline.
However, since the start of this decade there have been more suicides, more adolescents with major depressive episodes, and fewer people who had a dental visit in the past year.

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